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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0837.  Friday, 15 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 10:29:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture

(2)     From:   Bob Houck <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 11:50:51 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture;

(3)     From:   David Reinheimer <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 12:37:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0835  Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture

(4)     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 09:54:56 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture;

(5)     From:   Andrew Murphy <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Nov 1996 17:29:51 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 10:29:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture

I can't think offhand of any advertisements that feature Shakespeare, but
movies and TV are rife with references. Star Trek is the first place to look;
both the old and new series have many references to the Bard. In addition,
there are very funny and short scenes involving Shakespeare in LA Story and The
Last Action Hero (in the latter, Arh-nold's Die Hard Hamlet is the only fun
part of the movie). Also, if you think you class is at all interested in comic
books, you might check out The Sandman, which features three episodes with
Shakespeare himself.

Annalisa Castald
Temple University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Houck <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 11:50:51 -0500
Subject: 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture;
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture;

I am reminded of my college Theatre History professor's favorite story: There
was a farmer who had never been to a play in his life. His wife begged him to
go to the city to see a touring production of Hamlet. He reluctantly too his
wife to see the play.

When he was asked afterwards what he thought of it, he responded: "I don't see
why folks make such a big deal o this Shakespeare fella. All he does is take a
bunch of famous sayings and string em all together."

Not to mention FALSTAFF beer

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Reinheimer <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 12:37:59 -0500
Subject: 7.0835  Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0835  Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture

As far as advertising, the only thing that springs to mind is that Shakespeare
is a member of the genius club in a recent Altima commercial. As far as other
kinds of pop culture, there are films such as "Forbidden Planet," "My Own
Private Idaho," and "The Lion King."  On television, Shakespeare can be foudn
in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" and the afternoon childrens' cartoon
"Gargoyles."  And I'm sure this is not an exhaustive list.

Have a good day!
Dr. Dave Reinheimer

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www.cyberportal.net/dareinheimer/davesworld.html

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Nov 1996 09:54:56 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture;
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture;

To Subasashi Subbarao:

Michael Bristol's *Shakespeare's America, America's Shakespeare* (Routledge)
may prove helpful for your purposes.  His new text, *Big Time Shakespeare*
(Routledge), looks promising, as well.  Also, a different kind of text, Gary
Taylor's *Reinventing Shakespeare* (Oxford U P), may offer help.  Finally,
Marjorie Garber's article, "Shakespeare as Fetish," *Shakespeare Quarterly* 41
(1990): 242-50, may be useful, as well.

Regards,
Lynn

(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Nov 1996 17:29:51 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0835 Qs: Shakespeare and Popular Culture

A good starting point for Shakespeare & Popular Culture would be Graham
Holderness's _The Shakespeare Myth_ (Manchester UP/St. Martins, 1988), which
has various pieces on Shakespeare & contemporary society (see, esp. Derek
Longhurst's piece '"You base football player!" Shakespeare in contemporary
popular culture'). Jean Marsden's _The Appropriation of Shakespeare_ (Harvester
Wheatsheaf, 1991) also has some useful pieces. You might also want to look at
Michael Bristol's _Shakespeare's America, America's Shakespeare_ (Routledge,
1990) & perhaps the closing chapters of Gary Taylor's _Reinventing Shakespeare_
(OUP).

I too would be keen to hear about any material that is available on Capell.
I've never come across a detailed study of his work, though many of the other
C18th editors have had books written about them. Gary Taylor provides the basic
details of his career in both _Reinventing_ & in his intro to the Oxford
Shakespeare _Textual Companion_. There are also some details in McKerrow's 1933
British Academy Lecture on 'The Treatment of Shakespeare's Text by his Earliest
Editors'.

Hope this is useful.
Andrew
 

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