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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: Politics; Shakespeare in French
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0862.  Wednesday, 20 November 1996.

(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Nov 1996 11:25:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0846  Re: Politics and Interpretation

(2)     From:   Jesus Cora <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Nov 1996 18:23:49 UTC+0100
        Subj:   SHK 7.0850  Q: Shakespeare in French


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Nov 1996 11:25:40 -0500
Subject: 7.0846  Re: Politics and Interpretation
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0846  Re: Politics and Interpretation

Surajit A. Bose writes:

>When self-professed Marxists (are there any other kind?) discuss ideology, the
>definition they're usually invoking is Althusser's: see "Ideology and
>Ideological State Apparatii" in *"Lenin and Philosophy" and Other Essays.*
>Surely Bill Godshalk knows this. . . .

I've read Althusser's chapter on ideology and ISAs, but it seems to me that
there's a vagueness in the way "ideology" is now used--not that Althusser
himself is very clear. For example, in this chapter, Althusser gives no account
of change.  Given his description of ideology, one would think, in fact, that
ideology was extremely stable.  I need hardly point out that other Marxist
writers note the instability of ideological hegemony.  I suppose the USSR is a
good example.

If you don't like the prevailing "ideology" (however you define
"ideology"--e.g., "cosmic muffin" or "hairy thunderer"), just wait.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Nov 1996 18:23:49 UTC+0100
Subject: Q: Shakespeare in French
Comment:        SHK 7.0850  Q: Shakespeare in French

Dear Bianca Walther,

I may be mistaken, but, if I remember correctly, the first French author to
discuss and translate Shakespeare was Voltaire. Shakespeare was known in Spain
through the first French translations which encouraged Moratin to translate
them (Voltaire's translations) into Spanish.

All the best.
 

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