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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: Acting Companies; Popular Culture; Politics
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0865.  Thursday, 21 November 1996.

(1)     From:   David J. Kathman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Nov 1996 10:02:07 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0857  Q: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays

(2)     From:   Eric Weil <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Nov 1996 19:15:40 -0500
        Subj:   RE:  Shakespeare & Popular Culture

(3)     From:   David Schalkwyk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 15:26:29 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0862  Re: Politics


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David J. Kathman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Nov 1996 10:02:07 +0100
Subject: 7.0857  Q: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0857  Q: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays

Beth Cherne wrote:

>Recently a query was posted concerning originators of roles in Shakespeare's
>plays.  Where might one find information on the subject of acting companies and
>roles they played?

Andrew Gurr's recent (1996) book *The Shakespearean Playing Companies* gathers
together pretty much all that is known about all the acting companies in
England between 1558 and 1642.  Knowledge of particular roles that actors
played is spotty at best, but Gurr presents what little is known on the
subject, in addition to a wealth of other information.

Dave Kathman

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Weil <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Nov 1996 19:15:40 -0500
Subject:        RE:  Shakespeare & Popular Culture

A few days ago someone queried on this subject.  Today a colleague reminded me
that in the Beatles' song, "I am the Whale" several lines from _King Lear_ ,
4.6.242-50, parts of speeches by Oswald, Edgar, and Gloucester are quoted.
Beginning with "Slave, thou hast slain me" and ending with "What, is he dead?"
Apparently the song led some people to believe that Paul had died.

Eric Weil
Shaw University

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 15:26:29 SAST-2
Subject: 7.0862  Re: Politics
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0862  Re: Politics

I'm surprised by the claims that most self-professed Marxists subscribe to
Althusser's theory of ideology.  I know many Marxists who stand firmly behind
E.P. Thompson's scathing attack on Althusser in _The Poverty of Theory_.  I
personally prefer both Gramsci's notion of hegemony (used by the left in
England during the early eighties to try to account for the hold of that
Thatcher exerted over English society when Althusser proved unhelpful) and
Raymond Williams' notion of "structures of feeling", which is different from
both pre-Althusserian notions of ideology as "false consciousness" and the
Lacanian concept of the interpellation of the subject in Althusser.  Then,
moving away from Marxism, there are Foucauldian notions of "discourse"
(influential, in different ways, in both Said's post-colonial theory and the
New Historicism) and Derrida's notion of the "text", all of which attempt to
address similar issues and problems.

No, there are many different concepts of "ideology", Marxist or non- Marxist.
And this in itself renders the claim that "everything is ideology" either false
or unintelligible.

David Schalkwyk
University of Cape Town
 

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