1996

Q: Merry Wives

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0874.  Friday, 22 November 1996.

From:           LaRue Love Sloan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 16:27:45 CST
Subject:        Merry Wives

One of our graduate students is researching the Latin lesson scene in *The
Merry Wives of Windsor* (4.1) and has done an impressive amount of research.
Now he is really interested in finding out how this scene is being handled in
contemporary productions. He'd like to hear from directors, dramaturges,
actors, scholars, or spectators. Can anybody help?

                                        LaRue Love Sloan
                                        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The student's e-mail address is  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Folger Open House

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0873.  Friday, 22 November 1996.

From:           Georgianna Ziegler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 96 15:03:00 PST
Subject:        Folger Open House

The Folger Library invites interested Shakespeareans who will be in Washington
D.C. for MLA to stop by at the Folger for tea and scones on Sunday afternoon,
December 29, between 12 and 4.  On view will be the important exhibition of
engravings by the 17th-century artist, Wenceslaus Hollar.  We hope you will
take a break from the crowded hotels and enjoy some quiet times with friends
here at the Library.  The Folger Library is on the Red Line Metro (Union
Station stop) and the Blue and Orange Lines (Capitol South stop).  The ride is
about 15 mins. from the conference hotel at Woodley Park (Red Line).

Georgianna Ziegler
Reference Librarian

Re: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays; Politics

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0871.  Friday, 22 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Leslie Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 09:45:56 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0857  Q: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays

(2)     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 16:14:57 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 7.0862 Re: Politics


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Thomson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 09:45:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0857  Q: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0857  Q: Original Casts in Shakespere's Plays

In addition to Andy Gurr's book there is *Casting Shakespeare's Plays: London
actors and their roles, 1590-1642* by T.J. King (Cambridge UP, 1992).

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 16:14:57 -0000
Subject: 7.0862 Re: Politics
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0862 Re: Politics

Sorry Bill,

Althusser DOES give an account of change: when the forces of production are out
of synchronization with the relations of production.  All very simple really.

Best wishes
John Drakakis

Another Hypertext R3

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0872.  Friday, 22 November 1996.

From:           Laura Blanchard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 10:26:21 -0500
Subject:        Another Hypertext R3

The American Branch of the Richard III has just completed its hypertext edition
of Shakespeare's Richard III. Of particular interest to some readers will be
the hypertext links to excerpts from Charles Ross's biography of Richard III,
juxtaposing the dramatic events with the actual history of the time.

This is not in any sense a scholarly edition--various volunteers, with varying
levels of expertise, have done the initial keyboarding, HTML markup, and
proofreading. (It is, however, fairly visually appealing.) We realize that at
some point we will have to go back and clean it up, put in line numbers, etc.
We also hope to include additional links -- to a forthcoming online edition of
Holinshed's Chronicles, for example, and possibly to performance history.

Regards,
Laura Blanchard
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Large Marine Mammals and the Beatles

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0870.  Friday, 22 November 1996.

(1)     From:   James Schaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 11:21:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture

(2)     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 12:34:57 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Walruses and Kings

(3)     From:   Mason West <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 12:42:18 -0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture

(4)     From:   Whit Wales <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 12:30:45 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 11:21:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture

RE: Eric Weil's comments:

Linguistic errors are very interesting.  Weil cited the Lear quotations in the
Beatle's song, "I Am the Whale"; it was, of course, "I Am the Walrus."  (Cucu
cachoo)  What's interesting is that what he obviously remembered was that the
title included the name of a large marine mammal, and almost 30 yrs later, a
whale pops up.

About the substance of his comments:  The one Lear line that I heard clearly
and that still sticks with me is, "Sit you down, Father; rest ye."  And don't
forget that in the White Album, we are told, "I've got news for you all: / The
walrus was Paul."

There are some who still believe that the music of the band Wings proved that
Paul _did_ die!

Jim Schaefer

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 12:34:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Walruses and Kings

Actually, Mr. Weil, the song title is "I am the Walrus", the most potent,
audible lines at the end of the song are the exchange between Gloucester and
Edgar:

"Is he dead?"
"Sit ye down, father, rest you"

There are references to custard, dead dog's eyes, etc. in the song, so in terms
of popular culture, this ranks as a masterpiece of Bardic interpretation.
There's bound to be a paper in this one, if there hasn't been one or three
written already.

Andy White
Urbana, IL

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mason West <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 12:42:18 -0200
Subject: 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture

Eric Weil wrote:

    A few days ago someone queried on this subject.  Today a
    colleague reminded me that in the Beatles' song, "I am the
    Whale" several lines from _King Lear_ , 4.6.242-50, parts of
    speeches by Oswald, Edgar, and Gloucester are quoted.
    Beginning with "Slave, thou hast slain me" and ending with
    "What, is he dead?" Apparently the song led some people to
    believe that Paul had died.

It's a minor point, but you probably mean "I Am the Walrus," on The Magical
Mystery Tour album. The Shakespearean quotes are incidental audio deep in the
mix, and whoever identified the quotes must have had a far better stereo system
than I did. I could, however, make out the final "What, is he dead?"

-- Mason West
   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Whit Wales <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Nov 1996 12:30:45 -0500
Subject: 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0865  Re: Popular Culture

> Today a colleague reminded me that in the Beatles' song, "I am the Whale"

"I am the Walrus", perhaps?

Are not the Beatles as sacred as the Bard?! What is he to Hecuba? Lear to
Lennon?

The connection's got to be accurate on both sides, or - Pop goes the Culture...

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