1996

Call for submissions: ELS

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0854.  Monday, 18 November 1996.

From:           Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 17 Nov 1996 16:00:47 -0800
Subject:        Call for submissions

=================== PLEASE CROSS-POST ===================

English Literary Studies seeks quality submissions for its annual monograph
series. ELS publishes peer-reviewed monographs (usual length 45,000-60,000
words) on the literatures written in English. The Series is open to a wide
range of methodologies, and it considers for publication a variety of scholarly
works: bibliographies, scholarly editions, and historical and critical studies
of significant authors, texts, and issues. For further information write the
Editor, English Literary Studies, Department of English, University of
Victoria, P.O. Box 3070, Victoria, B.C., Canada.

Re: Hymen

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0853.  Monday, 18 November 1996.

From:           Peter L Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Nov 1996 10:35:36 GMT+1000
Subject: 7.0831  Re: As You Like It
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0831  Re: As You Like It

>> Hymen was a white-haired woman (quite
>>matronly) in the last scene of *As You Like It* in RSC prod. in
>>Stratford-upon-Avon, also summer '96.
>
>I saw that production too. The actor came up out of the audience. I thought
>that she was some little old lady who had lost her way. It was quite a shock
>when she took  part in the play. The fact that the part was played by a woman
>was of no consequence, but her entry into the play from the audience marred the
>play,  I thought.

I too witnessed this bizzarrerie; what made it even stranger was the programme
note from the director, Steven Pimlott: "I think one has to take the Folio at
its word and see this as a theophany: the god comes to earth, as in several of
Shakespeare's late plays.  Hymen is the final manifestation of Arden's magic".
[!]

Re: Madness; Gloucester' Blinding; Hamlet as Sleuth

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0851.  Monday, 18 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Nov 1996 16:34:42 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0843 Qs: Lear

(2)     From:   Thomas Berger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 17 Nov 1996 08:31:18 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0840 Questions Suggested by Productions

(3)     From:   H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 17 Nov 1996 18:17:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0830 Re: Hamlet as Sleuth


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Nov 1996 16:34:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 7.0843 Qs: Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0843 Qs: Lear

To Jennifer Kordus:

You may find it helpful to contact Carol Neely at U of IL, Urbana- Champaign
(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), regarding the issue of madness in early modern
England.

Regards,
Evelyn Gajowski

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Berger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 17 Nov 1996 08:31:18 EST
Subject: 7.0840 Questions Suggested by Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0840 Questions Suggested by Productions

RE: Mike Fields / Gloucester's blinding

I think that the folio omits the lines of the servants after the blinding,
which appear only in the 1608 quarto.  You might want to consult TAYLOR and
WARREN's DIVISION OF THE KINGDOM.  Those very sensitive lines were written, it
seems, to get Glouceseter off stage, clean him, up bandagethose missing orbs
and send him out into the next scene.  With an "act pause" as there may have
been after 1608-ish, all this is unnecessary, as the act pause give the actor a
chance to do this while the audience goes out to smoke cigarettes, eat ice
cream, have a coca-cola.

tom berger st. lawrence university

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 17 Nov 1996 18:17:35 -0500
Subject: 7.0830 Re: Hamlet as Sleuth
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0830 Re: Hamlet as Sleuth

Many thanks for the respondents to my question re Hamlet as sleuth manquee.

I would be grateful for the complete Peter Alexander reference, "Hamlet, Father
and Son" as well as the reference cited from CURTAINS.

My first pass on DYSTHYMIC DICKS FROM DUPIN TO CRACKER will appear next month
in Psychiatric Times (I'm in the process of expanding this to a larger
article). If anyone wants a copy of the Times piece, send me your address.

Additions for the SPINOFF BIBLIO File

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0852.  Monday, 18 November 1996.

From:           William D Walsh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Nov 1996 15:04:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Additions for the SPINOFF BIBLIO File

You are probably already aware of this:  Neil Gaiman dedicated two issues of
the comic book _Sandman_ to Shakespeare plays.  The first, _Sandman_ #19 (also
reprinted in the collection _Dream Country_), deals with _A Midsummer Night's
Dream_.  The second is entitled _The Tempest_ (it is, interestingly enough, the
final issue of _Sandman_ and Gaiman's farewell to his readers.

Q: Shakespeare in French

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0850.  Monday, 18 November 1996.

From:           Bianca Walther <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Nov 1996 13:18:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Q: Shakespeare in French

Dear SHAKESPEAReans,

I am writing a paper about parallels in _King Lear_ and Molie`re's _Tartuffe_.
Although I do not assume that Molie`re borrowed from _King Lear_, it would be
helpful to know if and to what extent Shakespeare's plays were read in France.
Does anyone know about early translations of Lear, or other plays, into French
-- e.g. when they were done and who did them?

Merci,
Bianca Walther

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