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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: October ::
Qs: Electronic Materials; R3 Deformities; Sabbatical
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0725.  Saturday, 5 October 1996.

(1)     From:   Milla Riggio <
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        Date:   Thursday, 03 Oct 1996 12:43:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   [Q: Electronic Materials]

(2)     From:   Jim Helsinger <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Oct 1996 00:14:35 -0400
        Subj:   RIII Deformities

(3)     From:   David Schalkwyk <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Oct 1996 15:15:25 SAST-2
        Subj:   Sabbatical Enquiry


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <
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Date:           Thursday, 03 Oct 1996 12:43:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        [Q: Electronic Materials]

Dear Fellow Shakesperians:

Finishing up a small project, I am trying to see what editions of Shakespeare
are attached to available electronic materials.  I think the two primary
editions so used are the Oxford, for which there is of course the entire
electronic edition, and the Riverside.  But can you help me with specific
information on what programs, CD-rom and otherwise, might be linked with
specific Shakespearian editions?

Thanks.
 Milla Riggio

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Helsinger <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Oct 1996 00:14:35 -0400
Subject:        RIII deformities

I am directing a production of Richard III next Spring and have been having
long conversations with the lead actor about deformity possibilities.  We've
discussed previously performed deformities such as Ian Mckellan's unusable arm,
Antony Sher's crutches, Stacy Keach's leg braces, Olivier's slight hump, etc,
etc.  We are not very interested in copycatting what another performer has
done, but it is very informative to hear of other ways the role has been
performed.

I wanted to ask the group:

What you have seen that has been effective? Any other thoughts on the play?
What about the human side of Richard? I think Richard is a much more straight
forward villian/vice character than, for instance, Iachimo, Iago or Macbeth.
In what ways have you seen his need for love, compassion, and friendship
effectively shown in production? How has the journey of how he became who he
is in the play been effectively told (besides reading the Henry VI plays...)?
Thanks in advance for any feedback. You can post to the list or directly to
me at 
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PS: I don't mean to drag any politics into this list, but I've found it very
interesting to watch Bob Dole's physicality on compaign while working on this
play.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 4 Oct 1996 15:15:25 SAST-2
Subject:        Sabbatical Enquiry

This is a general request for advice about a sabbatical that is not entirely
unconnected to the subject of Shakespeare.  My wife and I plan to spend a
year-long sabbatical outside South Africa in 1998 or 1999, and I was wondering
whether anyone could offer some advice about where to go.  I'm planning to
embark on a project on Shakespeare and language which will combine a knowledge
of twentieth- century theories and philosophies of language with Renaissance
theories of language and rhetoric.

My wife is a constitutional lawyer, especially in the fields of Human Rights
Law and women's rights.  She is currently a member of the panel of experts
advising the South African Constitutional Assembly on the writing of the new
constitution.  She holds the Chair of Human Rights law at the University of
Cape Town. I'm a Senior Lecturer in the English Department at UCT.  We have two
children, aged 10 and 7.

We would ideally like to visit an institution that is strong in both
constitutional law and Renaissance studies; preferably one which has some form
of money available in the form of Visiting or Research Fellowships.  It would
also be useful for me to have access to a library with a large Renaissance
collection or at least a fairly comprehensive microfilm collection.

Does anyone have any suggestions or offers?  I can be contacted directly via
e-mail: 
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 . CVs can be sent to anyone interested.

We have already spent a number of years doing research in England, and so, for
the sake of variety, would prefer not to go back there.

Thanks
David Schalkwyk
English Department
University of Cape Town
Private Bag
Rondebosch 7700
South Africa
Phone: (021) 650-3373       Fax: (021) 650-3726
 

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