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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: October ::
Granville-Barker; "Respecting"; Richard the Third
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0728.  Monday, 7 October 1996.

(1)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Saturday, 5 Oct 1996 15:13:12 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0714  Re: Granville-Barker

(2)     From:   Kenneth Brown <
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        Date:   Sunday, 6 Oct 1996 08:53:02 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0724  Re: "Respecting"

(3)     From:   Kenneth Brown <
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        Date:   Sunday, 6 Oct 1996 09:00:28 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: Richard the Third


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Saturday, 5 Oct 1996 15:13:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 7.0714  Re: Granville-Barker
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0714  Re: Granville-Barker

Terry writes:

> Dear Harry Hill, It's hard to see how Granville-Barker's tinkerings with the
> so-called 'thrust' stage and his other ill-conceived gestures in the direction
> of early modern performance square with his ultimate commitment to
> psychological realism. The modes of the one undermine the principles of the
> other.

But so what?  This just shows that the man has enough taste not to be slave to
his own theories.

> Needless to say, this contradiction flawed many of his productions, not
> least the one at the Old Vic in London in 1940. Gielgud, who gave a grateful
> nation his King Lear therein, offered the fatuous comment 'It seemed to take
> our minds off the awful things that were happening in France'. 'Ja', as Goethe
> used to say. That's precisely what was wrong with it.

Would an audience incapable of taking its mind off disastrous contemporary
events be capable of wanting peace?  Or even thinking of a peaceful situation,
in which one can, for instance, read literature, as possible?

Cheers,
Sean.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth Brown <
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Date:           Sunday, 6 Oct 1996 08:53:02 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: 7.0724  Re: "Respecting"
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0724  Re: "Respecting"

Re David Evett's reference to Martha Henry playing Doll Tearsheet. Indeed, I
too remember this rivetting performance, and wish to assure Mr. Evett that she
was equally perfect as the ancient curmudgeon of Albee's Three Tall Women last
year, in the preeminent Canadian production of that play.  There is also a fine
new film of Long Day's Journey featuring Ms. Henry.  What an actress!

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth Brown <
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Date:           Sunday, 6 Oct 1996 09:00:28 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        Re: Richard the Third

In response to Mr. Helsinger's inquiry, I have always believed that Richard's
speech in 3HenryVI is the most pychologically powerful speech of any of S's
villains.

Why love forswore me in my mother's womb
And for I should not deal in her soft laws
She did corrupt frail nature with some bribe
To shrink mine arm like a withered shrub...

I may be mistaken, but I believe I heard a piece of it in McKellan's latest
RIII version.
 

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