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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: September ::
Re: Nashville *JC*; Parodies; Funeral Elegy
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0641.  Tuesday, 3 September 1996.

(1)     From:   Jenny Lowood <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Sep 1996 12:10:05 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0640 Re: Nashville *JC*

(2)     From:   Albert Misseldine <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Sep 1996 09:58:35 -0400
        Subj:   Parodies

(3)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Sep 1996 19:57:57 -0700
        Subj:   Funeral Elegy


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jenny Lowood <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Sep 1996 12:10:05 -0400
Subject: 7.0640 Re: Nashville *JC*
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0640 Re: Nashville *JC*

>Is anyone else out there disturbed by the term "ripped off" >here? I may be
>displaying ignorance but I am not familiar with Oskar Eustis' >work. Yet I
>directed a similar approach to *JC* in 1992 in Knoxville >using the modern
>political arena and media as a setting for the show, albeit >without
>cross-gender casting.

In reply to Jeff Kean's question, I agree.  The notion that putting JC in a
modern political context is highly original seems to me very naive.  I saw a
production similar to the one he described about five years ago at the Julia
Morgan Theater in Berkeley (put on by the California Shakespeare Festival). It
was set specifically in the Kennedy era, pillbox hats for the ladies and all,
but the TV cameras, questions from the press, business suits, and so on were
all there.  It's a natural connection.  This particular performance lacked the
cross-gender casting, but this too is a common contemporary device at
Shakespeare performances.

                                      Jenny Lowood

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <
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Date:           Tuesday, 3 Sep 1996 09:58:35 -0400
Subject:        Parodies

Channel-surfing the other night I noticed a parody of the grave digger scene
from Hamlet in a movie called LA Story with Steve Martin. Also the
"wonderful,most wonderful..." line from AYLI was quoted, and there may be more
stuff. Cheers. A Misseldine

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Sep 1996 19:57:57 -0700
Subject:        Funeral Elegy

Prof. Leo Stock of the University of Ottawa, was the chief editor of The
Nondramatic Works of John Ford: Mediaeval & Renaissance Texts & Studies
(Binghamton, 1991).  He is a foremost Ford scholar and took for his special
study "Fames's Memorial", the Elegy that compares very closely with the
"Funeral Elegy", as has been demonstrated on this line. He has allowed me to
quote his opinion on the latter poem:

"Were the "new" piece published anonymously, I would unhesitatingly ascribe it
to Ford.  Despite the initials, I see nothing in the work that would suggest
Shakespeare."

This is the opinion of a man who has taught both Ford and Shakespeare for some
three decades.
 

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