Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: September ::
Re: "Shylock"
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0649.  Thursday, 12 September 1996.

(1)     From:   James J. Hill, Jr. <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 07 Sep 1996 09:28:39 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shylock

(2)     From:   Andrew Walker White <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 6 Sep 1996 18:24:13 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shylock


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James J. Hill, Jr. <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 07 Sep 1996 09:28:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shylock

A recent posting noted a monologue "Shylock" by Mark Leiren-Young had been
published.  I would greatly appreciate bibliographic details of the publication
as I have not been able to locate the item.  Thanks.

                                James J. Hill, Jr.  TSU

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 6 Sep 1996 18:24:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shylock

I would be very curious to hear more about this monologue under discussion --
which critics does this play take on?

There is an excellent treatment of Merchant currently in the Avon theater at
the Stratford Festival.  It sets the action firmly in Fascist Italy, complete
with blackshirts sipping coffee at St. Mark's square.  Rather than idealize
Shylock, or deny the ugliness that lies within even the heros of this 'comedy',
it manages to show the environment in which Shylock can in fact become
overwhelmed with rage, and in which purportedly nice gentiles can themselves be
perfect beasts.  There is a balance struck, simply by adhering to the original
text and by setting the piece in a time when all of the action seems not only
natural but inevitable.  From what a friend told me while I was there, it was a
rare occasion in which the whole community approved of the production.

The play has its ugliness, and it runs so deep that I once heard Sir Ian
McKellan declare he would never play Shylock.  Perhaps if he were given an
opportunity to see what Stratford has done with it, he could be persuaded to
change his mind.

Andrew White
Urbana, IL
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.