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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: September ::
Re: New Globe; State of the Profession
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0657.  Saturday, 14 September 1996.

(1)     From:   Thomas F. Connolly <
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        Date:   Friday, 13 Sep 1996 19:15:02 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0655 The New Globe

(2)     From:   Allen Walker <
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        Date:   Saturday, 14 Sep 96 00:57:53 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0654  Re: The State of the Profession


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas F. Connolly <
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Date:           Friday, 13 Sep 1996 19:15:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0655 The New Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0655 The New Globe

Steven Marx's comments are a wonderful precis of the anti-reconstruction
argument couched in the enthusiastic language of a pro-reconstructionist. A
point by point consideration of his comments nonetheless directs one to
question the premise of the reconstruction.  The positivistic elan that informs
Mr Marx's sophisticated recapitulation of his experience in the theatre causes
confirms my suspicions about the venture.  I direct list-readers to the current
issue of __Theatre Symposium__ and the essay by Ronald Vince.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Allen Walker <
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Date:           Saturday, 14 Sep 96 00:57:53 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 7.0654  Re: The State of the Profession
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0654  Re: The State of the Profession

>From:           Jean Peterson <
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>I don't know what Bill Godshalk means by calling "the state of the profession"
>fragmented--I would more correctly call it "terrified".  As if all those jobs
>that DID NOT materialize in the 1990's and the thousands of qualified and
>talented Ph.D's desperate for employment were not enough; as if the hostility
>of the religious right and Republican majority to the mythic "tenured
>radicals"--you know, all those militant Marxist feminazi lesbian homosexual
>Satan-worshippers currently in charge of American universities --hasn't done
>enough damage in drying up millions of dollars in formerly available loans,
>grants and subsidies, demoralizing and impoverishing students and faculty alike
>(and making college simply impossible for many). Now we have the very real and
>present danger to the tenure system, first enacted in the firing of a third of
>the tenured faculty at Bennington last year, and currently embodied in
>legislature proposed and about-to-be-voted on at the University of Minnesota.

Having completed my MFA in theatre/film in May 1995, and more recently having
completed my first semester teaching on the university level (I have taught at
private academies for several years on a part-time basis), I have observed a
distinct line between several modes of approach to theatre, most of them
interestingly diverse and inspirational.  However, as a person who considers
himself  a conservative moderate (I also happen to be a Christian), I
personally have been vilified by many of my colleages and former academic
professors as a member of the so-called "religious right" when in fact I do not
consider myself to be an extremist of any kind.  I find an appreciation for
lesbian theatre as well as evangelical drama, Shakespeare as well as Marlow,
performance art as well as Broadway musicals -- yet for some reason my
colleagues still tend to brand me and my art as "threats" of some kind.

I dare say that there might be some form of theatre/literature that each of us
might find personally repulsive, not to our liking, against our values,
whatever.  I simply find it interesting that, more often than not (in my
experience), any form of academia that even remotely embraces a judeo-christian
perspective is treated with the same aversion one might have found in an 18th
century leper colony.  Whether or not I embrace the moral implications the
views of so-called "tenured radicals", more often than not I have found this to
be a one-sided battle.

I'd be interested to hear from others in our profession who have experienced
this form of oppression in the guise of political correctness.  Funding and
other issues aside, at least our theatres are not being physically burned to
the ground by Puritans.

Regards,
---Allen Walker
---Fort Worth, Texas
 

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