1996

Q: *Rime of the Ancient Mariner*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0638.  Saturday, 31 August 1996.

From:           Ian H. Doescher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Aug 1996 21:50:44 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Although I realize that this topic is not Shakespeare, I thought that perhaps I
would try an idea on SHAKSPERians, hoping that the theme of dead English poets
would be acceptable.

I am attempting to put together a one-man show of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's
_Rime of the Ancient Mariner_.  The show would have background music and would
consist mainly of the Mariner on board a ship, telling the tale as the audience
sees it happen.

Can this work?  Is Coleridge's language not appropriate for entertainment
beyond reading appreciation and analyzation?  I would be grateful for the
opinions of SHAKSPERians, which I value highly.

Thank you.
Ian Doescher
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Re: Merchant of Venice and Revenge; Parodies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0637.  Saturday, 31 August 1996.

(1)     From:   Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Aug 1996 10:42:19 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0627 Re: Merchant of Venice and Revenge

(2)     From:   Melissa Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Aug 1996 17:00:51 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0635  Re: Parodies


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Aug 1996 10:42:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 7.0627 Re: Merchant of Venice and Revenge
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0627 Re: Merchant of Venice and Revenge

On Mon, 26 Aug 1996, Bernice W. Kliman wrote:

<snip>
> Douce says, "[....] It will be readily conceded that there happily exist in
> the present moment but few remains of the illiberal prejudices complained
> of, the asterity of which has been greatly mitigated by the laudable and
> successful exertions of a modern dramatic writer, to whom the Jewish people
> are under the highest obligation" (1:292).
>
> Does anyone know who this "modern dramatic writer" might be?

Since the question is "might be", I'd guess Lessing.  I have no evidence for
this beyond the fact that _Nathan the Wise_ (1779), which preached universal
love between/among races, was both a popular and critical success not too long
prior to the quotation in question.

Rick Jones
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Aug 1996 17:00:51 -0600
Subject: 7.0635  Re: Parodies
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0635  Re: Parodies

>The recent postings on parodies has brought out of the depths of my memory a
>'Li'l Abner' series from several decades ago.  'Li'l Abner', for those too
>young to remember, was a syndicated comic strip drawn by the cartoonist and
>social critic Al Capp.  The title character was the scion of a hillbilly family
>called the Yokums.  Daisy Mae, daughter of the Scragg family, was in love with
>Li'l Abner, in spite of the fact that the Yokums and the Scraggs were in a
>state of feud. I think it was in a dream sequence that the constellation was
>transplanted to renaissance Italy and a drama was woven around the relationship
>between Romeo Yokumgo and Juliet Scragglet.  This may have seen print before
>1950. The serious PhD student doing a thesis on parodies should be able to find
>out who syndicated the strip and would have an enjoyable time reading through
>the episodes till he found this one.

The Al Capp dailies are being reprinted in their totality by Kitchen Sink
Press.  They've gotten up to at least 1952, so the R &J sequence is probably
available.

Melissa Aaron

Re: Parodies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0635.  Friday, 30 August 1996.

From:           Sydney Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Aug 1996 08:21:26 +0200 (IST)
Subject:        Parodies

The Wayne and Shuster Years, a commercial video released in 1996 by Astral
Video in Canada under CBC's copywrite contains a remake of "Kiss the Blood off
My Toga", in which Julius Caesar's murder is treated as a whodunnit. It has the
detective walking into a bar and ordering a martinus (If he had wanted two he
would have asked in the plural), and Calpurnia wailing "I told him:'Julie,
don't go!'"

The videocasette also  has "Shakesperian Baseball", done in meter with an all
male cast and immortal lines such as "so fair a foul I have not seen!"
Shakesperian's from cricket playing regions might need a commentary for
technical terms, but human universals might come through even for the
unschooled.

The recent postings on parodies has brought out of the depths of my memory a
'Li'l Abner' series from several decades ago.  'Li'l Abner', for those too
young to remember, was a syndicated comic strip drawn by the cartoonist and
social critic Al Capp.  The title character was the scion of a hillbilly family
called the Yokums.  Daisy Mae, daughter of the Scragg family, was in love with
Li'l Abner, in spite of the fact that the Yokums and the Scraggs were in a
state of feud. I think it was in a dream sequence that the constellation was
transplanted to renaissance Italy and a drama was woven around the relationship
between Romeo Yokumgo and Juliet Scragglet.  This may have seen print before
1950. The serious PhD student doing a thesis on parodies should be able to find
out who syndicated the strip and would have an enjoyable time reading through
the episodes till he found this one.  I read it in the Toronto Star.  I believe
Al Capp has been the subject of a biography.

Sincerely yours,
Sydney Kasten
Jerusalem

West Michigan Festival; ACTER Fall 1996 Tour

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0636.  Saturday, 31 August 1996.

(1)     From:   Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Aug 1996 08:38:22 -0400
        Subj:   West Michigan Festival

(2)     From:   Cynthia Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Aug 1996 06:50:01 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   ACTER Fall 1996 Tour of *Much Ado About Nothing*


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Aug 1996 08:38:22 -0400
Subject:        West Michigan Festival

The 1996 Shakespeare festival at Grand Valley State University (Allendale,
Michigan) is scheduled for September 27 to October 6. If any of you are in the
area, please stop by.

The production this year is Twelfth Night, with two pro actors (playing Feste
and Sir Toby) and a student cast. Visiting firemen are David Bevington, John
Cox, Grace Tiffany (on the literary side) and Jane Kuipers, Kateri
Kline-Johnson, and David Pritchard (on the theatrics side).

There will also be musical events, a Renaissance dinner, some Shakespeare
satire by a good local improv group, and a number of films (with critical
panels).

Further info: e-mail me or Roger Ellis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cynthia Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Aug 1996 06:50:01 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        ACTER Fall 1996 Tour of *Much Ado About Nothing*

The Fall 1996 ACTER Tour of *Much Ado About Nothing* will be at these campuses:
Sept 13, one pretour performance at UNC-Chapel Hill, NC; Sept. 16-22,
University of Memphis, TN; Sept. 23-29, Middle Tennessee State University,
Murfreesboro, TN; Sept. 30-Oct. 6, Hendrix College, Conway AR; Oct. 7-13,
Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX; Oct. 14-20, UT-San
Antonio, TX; Oct. 21-27, University of Richmond, VA; Oct. 28-Nov. 3, UNC-Chapel
Hill; Nov. 4-10 DePauw University, Greencastle IN; Nov. 11-17,U. of
Pennsylvania, Philadelpia PA; Nov. 18-22 Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH. For
information on any of these residencies, contact cynthia dessen, manager, at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or, after Labor Day, visit the ACTER homepage at
http://www.unc.edu/depts/acter/

CFP: In Shakespeare's Shadow

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0634.  Friday, 30 August 1996.

From:           Andy Spong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Aug 1996 08:35:30 -0400
Subject:        'In Shakespeare's Shadow'


[The following was posted yesterday on REED-L: Records of Early English Drama
Discussion <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. --HMC]

                   IN SHAKESPEARE'S SHADOW
                   'MINOR' DRAMA, 1590-1610


                  A CONFERENCE TO BE HELD AT
                THE UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE
                        22 MARCH 1997

                *****   CALL FOR PAPERS   *****

'In Shakespeare's Shadow' will bring together research on the drama of
1590-1610 that is currently under-represented in literary study.  The aim
of the conference is to re-evaluate the drama of this period in its own
right, and to question the canonical authority that Shakespeare commands
to the detriment of all but a handful of his peers.

Proposal for papers (20 mins. in length) are invited on a range of
topics, including individual authors, canonical politics, intertextuality
and the production of meaning, authorial authority, drama as cultural
commodity, spectatorship and class, historicism vs. formalism, the
use-value of drama, theatre as national genre, drama as social labour,
difference dramatised, alternative heroes, disregarding/discarding
Shakespeare.

Theoretical and interdisciplinary work is especially welcome.

Proposals of no more than 300 words in length (deadline 31 January 1997)
and/or requests for further information should be sent to us at the
following address:

                Andy Spong and Andrew Stott
                Centre for Renaissance Studies
                University of Hertfordshire
                Wall Hall
                Aldenham
                Herts. WD2 8AT

or e-mail us at:

                This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

                This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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