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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: August ::
Re: Folio as Acting Script
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0606.  Friday, 8 August 1996.

(1)     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 8 Aug 96 22:09:31 GMT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script

(2)     From:   John Senczuk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Aug 1996 09:10:29 +1000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script

(3)     From:   Cynthia Hoffman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 8 Aug 1996 13:03:42 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 8 Aug 96 22:09:31 GMT
Subject: 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script

>I find myself still intrigued, if unconvinced, by the suggestion
>that the Folio represents an acting script.  Are there people out there --
>actors, directors, teachers, etc. -- who still hold strongly to this notion

Gabriel Egan

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Senczuk <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Aug 1996 09:10:29 +1000
Subject: 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script

I am currently two weeks into rehearsal for productions of MEASURE FOR MEASURE
and TIMON OF ATHENS (on a bare raised platform using the FOLIO texts)
principally to exercise the <<two door>> maps evolved by Tim Fitzpatrick
[Sydney University].  So far the Folio punctuation, emphasis (through capitals
and italics), lineage [the half lines are tremendous prompts for action] and
entrance placement have proved illuminating for actors. The meaning does come
from the spoken word.  I'll report further on the discoveries if it would be of
interest.

Yours
John Senczuk
University of Wollongong

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cynthia Hoffman <
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Date:           Thursday, 8 Aug 1996 13:03:42 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0603  Folio as Acting Script

The most vocal advocate I'm aware of of this particular use of the folio is
Patrick Tucker of the Original Shakespeare Company.  I seriously doubt he's
actually written anything about it given his contempt for academics and
academia as a whole, however, I recently saw a production of The Taming of the
Shrew in Toronto that was "directed" by him, and am attempting to get a second
interview with the actor who played Petruchio to discuss what it was like to
work both with Tucker and with the script in the ways that Tucker advocates.
Geraint Wyn Davies, the actor who played Petruchio in this particular
production described it as an interesting experience, but remained unconvinced
that it was really Shakespeare.

As someone who saw the production twice, on both opening and closing nights, as
well as attending a workshop with Mr. Tucker that same weekend, I'm not
convinced that it's more than a viable experiment, if and only if, one has the
actors with the classical training to pull it off.  Wyn Davies is talking about
getting a group of classically trained actors together to do a play a night
over a week's time and seeing what happens.  But he emphasised that it would be
necessary to have actors who were already familiar with the language and had
major classical training.

Shrew in April had three such actors.  And by closing night, they were all
running roughshod over the rest of them.  It felt like an evening with Monty
Python.

Cynthia Hoffman
UC Berkeley English

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