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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: August ::
Re: Nashville *JC*; Linguistic Studies; *MacHomer*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0631.  Wednesday, 28 August 1996.

(1)     From:   Tom Bishop ,
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        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Aug 1996 15:30:12 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0629  Nashville *JC*

(2)     From:   Juhani Rudanko <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Aug 1996 15:08:38 +0300 (EET DST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0628  Q: Linguistic Studies

(3)     From:   Ken Brown <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Aug 1996 06:26:23 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0626 Q: *MacHomer*


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop ,
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 .
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Aug 1996 15:30:12 -0400
Subject: 7.0629  Nashville *JC*
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0629  Nashville *JC*

>Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0629.  Tuesday, 27 August 1996.
>
>From:           Kay Campbell Pilzer <
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>Date:           Monday, 26 Aug 96 10:27 EST
>Subject:        Nashville *JC*

In a remarkable example of cultural convergence, the recently reported
Nashville "Julius Caesar" production has reproduced almost all the tricks I
recall from the Melbourne simulacrum I recently reported on through these very
netwaves, except that in the Antipodes it was Antony, not Cassius, who was a
woman, and the soothsayer was an -indigenous- homelessperson.

In other news, those in the Cleveland area have a rare chance to see a modern
equivalent of a medieval cycle-play this weekend, when Rev. Ernest Angely's
Grace Cathedral in Akron will be performing their production of "Jacob and
Joseph", a 3-hour extravaganza with a cast of 250, the script given to the
Reverend, as he avers, by the Lord himself, apparently along with the musical
numbers. The TV clips promise a wealth of enjoyment, though some of it alas may
have to be covert. I am particularly looking forward to the scene where Joseph
loses a piece of his garment to the clutches of Potiphar's scheming wife, who
resembles one of the wilder villainesses from daytime soap gone to town in
Aida's wardrobe. Veritably, not to be missed.

I note also this week, in Shakespeare round-up, that a translation of "Hamlet"
into the Klingon tongue, with extensive notes by the translator, is now
available from the Klingon Language Institute in PA. Have you got your copy
yet?

Some people have way too much time on their hands....

Cheers,
Tom

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Juhani Rudanko <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Aug 1996 15:08:38 +0300 (EET DST)
Subject: 7.0628  Q: Linguistic Studies
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0628  Q: Linguistic Studies

At the risk of being accused of self-promotion, I would like to mention my book
Pragmatic Approaches to Shakespeare (Lanham, MD: University Press of America,
1993), in response to the query about linguistic studies of Shakespeare. The
book discusses and develops a range of 20C linguistic methods, including case
grammar analysis, speech act theory, and conversation analysis, and applies
such methods to Othello, Coriolanus, and Timon of Athens. (A review of the
book, by Nanette Jaynes, is found in the Summer 1995 issue of The Shakespeare
Bulletin, 1995, p. 47.) Juhani Rudanko

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ken Brown <
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Date:           Tuesday, 27 Aug 1996 06:26:23 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: 7.0626 Q: *MacHomer*
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0626 Q: *MacHomer*

>In a feature on the Edmonton Fringe Festival in this Saturday's Globe and Mail,
>Chris Dafoe writes:
>
>         One of the big hits of the festival is _MacHomer_, Montrealer
>         Rick Miller's one-man version of _Macbeth_ as it would be
>         performed by the Simpsons.
>
>One's mind reels with the possibilities. Barney as the drunken porter? Flanders
>as MacDuff? ("What, all my pretty chickens and their dam / At one fell
>swoopily-doopily?)
>
>Edmontonion Shakspereans, have you seen this gem? Please report.

Actually, no, I didn't.  Our own show, a four-actor adaptation of Fielding's
"Joseph Andrews" kept me fairly busy, but I can report that it was THE pop hit
of the festival, largely due, I understand, to the performer's warm stage
presence and verbal gymnastics.  He uses 54 different voices, apparently.  I'm
hoping to catch the show in "holdover week," that post-Fringe phenom. in which
the performers who misses everybody else's work get to try to catch up.

Ken Brown
THEATrePUBLIC
 

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