1996

Re: *Hamlet* Questions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0598.  Tuesday, 6 August 1996.

From:           Lawrence S Schwartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 5 Aug 1996 10:18:54 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 7.0596 *Hamlet* Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0596 *Hamlet* Questions

"Discovering Hamlet" (it says here) is copyrighted 1990 by Unicorn Projects out
of Washington, D.C. and was distributed by PBS Video.  the catalog record, from
NDSU's online catalog is reproduced below:

         Title: Discovering Hamlet [videorecording] / Unicorn Projects,
                   Inc. ; produced by Larry Klein ; written and directed
                   by Mark Olshaker.
     Publisher: Alexandria, Va. : PBS Video, c1990.
   Description: 1 videocassette (53 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
Performer-Note: Featuring The Renaissance Theatre Company, directed
                   by Derek Jacobi.
Performer-Note: Kenneth Branagh (Hamlet), Richard Easton (Claudius),
                   Edward Jewesbury (Polonius), Sophie Thompson (Ophelia),
                   Jay Villiers (Laertes), other actors and technical
                   staff of the Company.
Performer-Note: Patrick Stewart.
       Summary: Follows the week-by-week progress of the Company preparing
                   to stage a production of Hamlet.  The actors describe
                   stage action and the characters they portray, and
                   members of the technical crew discuss aspects of
                   costuming, set design, lighting, and the problems
                   of working with Shakespeare's 400-year-old text.

Re: Whole Text on CD-ROM

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0597.  Monday, 5 August 1996.

From:           Ton Hoenselaars <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 05 Aug 1996 09:15:18 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

Does not Andromeda market the Oxford Shakespeare (Wells & Taylor) with Windows
facilities? The complete modern-spelling text of the plays, all the
introductions, notes, and a glossary. Only the names of Stanley Wells and Gary
Taylor are not mentioned. Or was Georgianna Ziegler thinking of the text on
disk? Hope this helps, Ton Hoenselaars, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Re: Funeral Elegy (Joe Klein and SHAXICON)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0595.  Sunday, 4 August 1996.

From:           Phyllis Gorfain <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Aug 1996 13:29:08 -0400
Subject: 7.0590  Re: Funeral Elegy
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0590  Re: Funeral Elegy

Last week's NEWSWEEK magazine ran more than story on the Joe Klein flap,
including a column by Klein himself; as a columnist for Newsweek, he had some
aplogizing to do since Newsweek had more than once been led to portray him as
emphatically not "Anonymous."  Printed in more than one of these stories was
the information that New York magazine hired Don Foster to do a computer
analysis of Primary Colors, and that when he did so, he identified Joe Klein as
the author; at that time, Klein denied authorship.  I think it would be
fascinating to hear from Don Foster, if he is willing to comment, about how
Shaxicon's findings in the Primary Colors question indicates anything more
about Shaxicon as an instrument for determining authorship.  Don, are you
willing to comment?  Thanks, if so!

*Hamlet* Questions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0596.  Monday, 5 August 1996.

From:           Edna Z. Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 04 Aug 96 11:12:52 EDT
Subject:        Hamlet Questions

Two Hamlet production questions:

1.  Does anyone know who released the video called "Discovering Hamlet" and in
what year?  And at the same time, in what city and year the production in which
Jacobi directed Branagh took place?

2.  A more obscure question: in the 1977 Daniel Mesguich production of Hamlet,
does anyone know what excerpt from Jean-Luc Godard's "La Chinoise" was inserted
into the middle of the "To be" speech (which was spoken by a player and not
Hamlet)?

Would appreciate help on either or both questions.  Thanks.

Re: Whole Text on CD-ROM

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0594.  Sunday, 4 August 1996.

(1)     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Aug 1996 16:54:52 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

(2)     From:   Karen Pirnie <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Aug 1996 17:57:47 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0591 Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

(3)     From:   Lee Jacobus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Aug 96 15:45:42T
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

(4)     From:   Karen Saupe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Aug 1996 14:39:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

(5)     From:   William L. Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 03 Aug 96 05:35:15 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Aug 1996 16:54:52 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

Georgianna,

There's a full-text Windows Shakespeare CD from the World Library, called the
Shakespeare Study Guide, which also includes selected Barron's Book Notes
(useful for checking for plagiarism). The text is primitive (awkward lineation,
etc.), but it does function adequately for many concordance uses. I think it
sells for maybe $40? (I didn't purchase it.)

Hope this helps.

Frank Whigham

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Pirnie <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Aug 1996 17:57:47 -0400
Subject: 7.0591 Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0591 Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

In reply to Georgianna Ziegler's query, I have a very good CD-ROM for Windows
called "William Shakespeare: The Complete Works on CD-ROM" put out by Andromeda
Interactive. It includes line numbers and textual variants, good introductions,
and notes for the major plays, as well as "study questions" at a good high
school or college freshman level.   It seems to be Taylor and Wells' recent
Oxford text  (the introduction to Pericles refers to their old-spelling
edition), although they are rather shockingly not credited. Perhaps because no
royalties are being paid, the CD cost only $49, as I recall.  If your
conscience permits, Andromeda's phone number is (510) 769-1616.  (I've been
able to assuage guilt with a gift of wine, but Gary would probably accept
donations from colleagues not in Alabama.)

Karen Pirnie
University of Alabama

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee Jacobus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Aug 96 15:45:42 EDT
Subject: 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

About the Complete Works of Shakespeare on CD-ROM: I have a disk by Creative
Multimedia at 513 NW 13th,Suite 400, Portland, OR 97209.  I have looked through
it and found it useful, but I have not really examined it for its textual
reliability.  It has the plays, poems, and sonnets "in full text."  Missing an
elegy,  of course.  I got it on some special order which I cannot remember--my
copy says "not for individual resale."  The compnay will know how you can get
it.  Good luck.

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Saupe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Aug 1996 14:39:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

We've just purchased a CD that contains both Mac and Windows versions of the
Oxford texts. (Apparently the Windows version is a very recent addition.) It's
available from The Writing Company (800-421-4245; email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;
web http://WritingCo.com/Shakespeare).

Karen

(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William L. Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 03 Aug 96 05:35:15 EDT
Subject: 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0591  Q: Whole Text on CD-ROM

Re: Georgianna Ziegler's inquiry about the complete text of Shakespeare on
CD-ROM for Windows.

In fact, there is such a disk, and there has been for years:  "Library of the
Future," 3rd edition, published by World Library.  It contains 1750 titles,
including the complete Shakespeare, complete Greek drama, complete Canterbury
Tales (in modern English). Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes,
other poetry and prose of Milton's.  Complete Arthur Conan Doyle!  Doctor
Faustus.  Complete Bible, Koran, Book of Mormon.  You name it. Altogether, it's
an astonishing array of texts.

The disk is designed to run on either DOS or Windows 3.1, and it does so rather
well.  The search devices work well.  It also includes video clips from film
versions of a dozen or so of the works.  They work fine on Windows 3.1, but
since I have changed to Win 95, they run only in full screen, low resolution
format, and I can't get any sound.  It hardly matters--the video clips are
nothing but  a waste of disk space.

That's the good news.  The bad news is that there is virtually no editorial
information or textual apparatus.  Who edited the Shakespeare texts?  Whose
translation of the Canterbury Tales is this?  Who translated the Greek plays?
Who wrote that long, first-person introduction to his/her translation of
Beowulf?  Is this the A or B text of Faustus?  (It's somebody's edition of A,
but I haven't had occasion to figure out whose.)

But there is some more good news:  it costs $39.95.  The same company also has
a disk dedicated to Shakespeare alone, but I haven't seen it, and I don't know
how much it is.  Compared to disks currently available from other companies, I
imagine it will be relatively free.  I called them to see if they are still in
business, and they are, and promise a 4th edition of Library of the Future this
fall, with 5,000 titles!

Despite its gross deficiencies, I have found this disk extremely useful on many
occasions.

They are in Garden Grove, California, and their phone number is 714-748-7197.

Bill Taylor
Seattle University

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