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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: July ::
Qs: Hubert & Arthur; Shakespeare and Marlowe
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0492.  Monday, 1 July 1996.

(1)     From:   Ed Friedlander <
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        Date:   Friday, 28 Jun 1996 09:43:45 CST
        Subj:   King John -- Hubert & Arthur

(2)     From:   Jennifer Formichelli <
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        Date:   Saturday, 29 Jun 1996 11:53:36 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Query: Shakespeare and Marlowe


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Friedlander <
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Date:           Friday, 28 Jun 1996 09:43:45 CST
Subject:        King John -- Hubert & Arthur

I would be most grateful if someone on the list could answer this question,
either to the list or by private E-mail to

    
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King John needs to kill his hostage Arthur, as Pandulph explains in the
chilling speech in the third act.  The exchange between King John & Hubert is
explicit, though fast: "Death?"  "A grave". "He shall not live."

I have always been told that Hubert decides not to blind Arthur because he
feels pity.

In reflecting, it seems more likely to me that the whole business with the hot
irons is a charade designed to force Arthur to make an escape attempt.  If he
is killed during the attempt, Hubert will have his deniability, just as
actually happens.  "I didn't know anything about it."  He doesn't fool
Faulconbridge, or apparently anybody else. If Arthur survives an escape
attempt, the worst that can happen is that he'll say Hubert spared him.

This seems disturbingly contemporary.  Does Hubert spare Arthur from pity, or
as part of a cynical plan to kill him?

I understand that the historical Hubert de Bergh was a rather enlightened
statesman.  Thanks.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jennifer Formichelli <
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Date:           Saturday, 29 Jun 1996 11:53:36 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Query: Shakespeare and Marlowe

Dear Shakespeare,

A query: I thought we might get a conversation going around Shakespeare's
relation to Marlowe. I noticed quite a few of you were Marlowe scholars as well
as Shakespeare enthusiasts or scholars. What I am wondering especially is if
anyone noticed not parallel passages but lines of Shakespeare that he adopted
and revised--or just adopted (ie, the Dido speech that the player reads for
Hamlet on Hamlet's request)--from Marlowe's plays. Eavesdropping yesterday on
your conversation regarding Merchant of Venice, I was tempted to think of the
Jew of Malta, especially when someone noted that Shylock doesn't seek blood
until the law refuses to help him. Though Barabas is more evil and more of a
caricature, this is very much his situation. There is too, for comparison,
Measure for Measure (pound of flesh...a pound of gold). I also wanted to drop
my cents into the fascinating conversation of Othello, thinking again about the
value of the token---now taken for humour--in Twelfth Night, of the ring that
Antonio gives to Portia, and that he gives back to her. And, in the comedy
discussion, how about the comic scenes within the tragedies, like the Fool in
Lear, the grave-digger in Hamlet, etc? One other thing: does anyone know why
the 'h' in the Folio of Anthony and Cleopatra is now usually removed?--Jennifer
Formichelli ( Sorry, I meant the ring that Portia gives to Antonio, and he
gives back to her in her disguise)
 

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