Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: July ::
Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe; Textual Criticism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0500.  Friday, 5 July 1996.

(1)     From:   Douglas S. Bruster <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Jul 1996 10:45:45 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0496 Re: Marlowe

(2)     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Jul 1996 17:19:25 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0497 Q: Textual Criticism

(3)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, July 5, 1996
        Subj:   Textual Criticism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas S. Bruster <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 3 Jul 1996 10:45:45 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 7.0496 Re: Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0496 Re: Marlowe

Re: the "Shakespeare and Marlowe" query.  This recommendation will probably be
seconded by others, but I'd like to offer a strong endorsement of James
Shapiro's _Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Jonson, Shakespeare_ (New York: Columbia
University Press, 1991).

Douglas Bruster

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 3 Jul 1996 17:19:25 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0497 Q: Textual Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0497 Q: Textual Criticism

As far as the idea of an exercise in textual criticism, the first thing that
leaps to my mind is Hamlet, since it is the only play that exists in three
distinct versions with some very interesting variations. For your own
reference, there is a parallel column edition called The Three Text Hamlet.
Someone else probably has the specific publishing information, off hand I only
remember that it was published about 5 years ago and that it is excellent for
comparing Q1 Q2 and the Folio texts.

Annalisa Castaldo
Temple University

[Editor's Note: Bertram, Paul, and Bernice W. Kliman.  *The Three-Text HAMLET:
Parallel Texts of the First and Second Quartos and the First Folio*.  New York:
AMS Press, 1991.]

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, July 5, 1996
Subject:        Textual Criticism

Here are two illustrative examples and an exercise.

To illustrate the importance of stage directions in the so-called "bad"
quartos, use the closet scene in Q1, Q2, and F1 *Hamlet* and compare to
Peter Alexander and Riverside modern texts.  Riverside includes Q1's
"<i>Enter the ghost in his night gowne</i>"; Alexander does not.

To illustrate modern editing, start with Alexander and Riverside 5.1.24
of *Romeo and Juliet*: "Is it [e'en] so? Then I [defy] you stars!"  Compare
to Q1's "Is it euen {s}o then I defie my Starres"; Q2's "Is it in {s}o?
then I denie you starres"; and F1's "Is it euen {s}o? / Then I denie you
Starres."

As an exercise, discuss the staging of *Romeo and Juliet* 5.3 by analyzing
Q1, Q2, and F1, especially paying attention to the stage directions.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.