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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: July ::
Re: Acting Shakespeare; Textual Criticism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0510.  Wednesday, 10 July 1996.

(1)     From:   Louis Scheeder <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jul 1996 00:39:24 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0508 Re: Acting Shakespeare

(2)     From:   Adrian Kiernander <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jul 1996 15:10:46 +1000 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Textual Criticism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Scheeder <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Jul 1996 00:39:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0508 Re: Acting Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0508 Re: Acting Shakespeare

Milla Riggio:

Please do not *silence* or efface yourself.  Trees can allow one to see the
forest.  "subtext' after all is a late-nineteenth century "invention" brought
about by the repressive nature of the czarist state.

louis scheeder

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adrian Kiernander <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Jul 1996 15:10:46 +1000 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Textual Criticism

Kristian Schmidt's parallel texts of the F and Q1 _Richard III_ may be of
interest to students wanting to compare different versions. The relationship
between these two texts is often baffling, and raises interesting questions
about how the texts came about which I have not seen adequately explained.

I hope that students engaged in such an exercise would also look at some of the
recent writing on the subject, especially Stephen Orgel's "What is a Text" and
Random Cloud's "The very names of the persons" (both conveniently collected in
Kastan and Stallybrass's _Staging the Renaissance_). Both these articles focus
on the question of the underlying assumptions of editors and the aim of the
editing process, questions which are sometimes overlooked or taken for granted,
but which can throw up valuable insights when confronted.

Adrian Kiernander
Department of Theatre Studies
University of New England
 

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