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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: June ::
Re: Comedy; Henry V; Milton; Wriothesley
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0461.  Wednesday, 19 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Barrett Fisher <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Jun 1996 12:33:35 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Shakespearean Comedy

(2)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Jun 1996 10:08:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0454  Re: Henry V in the Park

(3)     From:   Rebecca C Totaro <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Jun 1996 22:38:16 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0448  Re: Milton

(4)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Jun 1996 12:02:21 -0700
        Subj:   Wriothesley


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barrett Fisher <
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Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jun 1996 12:33:35 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Shakespearean Comedy

I'd like to pick up the thread from last week in response to Mario Ghezzi's
inquiry about help with teaching Shakespearean comedy:

I find Susan Snyder's book on tragedy very helpful in identifying the main
characteristics of Shakespearan comedy.  It's called The Comic Matrix of
Shakespeare's Tragedies (Princeton, 1979) and is equally stimulating in
teaching both tragedies and comedies.

I have also used a somewhat neglected book by Roland Frye: Shakespeare: The Art
of the Dramatist (Houghton Miflin, 1970).

I concur with those who have already mentioned Frye, Barber, and Evans.

Barrett Fisher
Bethel College (MN)

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 19 Jun 1996 10:08:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0454  Re: Henry V in the Park
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0454  Re: Henry V in the Park

Regarding the nature of Henry V as portrayed by Shakespeare:

Henry's orders to kill the prisoners aren't the only evidence of an unpleasant
tough-mindedness. The author makes a point of Hal's execution of his erstwhile
drinking buddy when he's caught robbing a church. Those wedded to the orthodox
chronology will disagree, but I see a great deal to recommend the possibility
that the version of HV in the First Folio was a reworking in the nineties of a
play written originally as pro-nationalist propaganda intended to rally
playgoers for the coming battle with the Spanish in the mid eighties. The
passionate jingoism ("we few, we happy few..."), the dramatization of how
disparate elements of the community, Welsh, Irish, Scottish, can fight together
for the all important common cause (we laugh, but are moved nonetheless), the
warning that desertion, pillaging, and treason carry a mortal pricetag, all
point to a work written with a subtext that was very important at the time.
Shakespeare's Henry was a king with a purpose, to rally the English for the
coming battle with Spain by reminding them of a similar victory centuries
earlier over France. "We did it before and we can do it again." Interesting
that the English used this play for the same purpose in the early 1940's, when
they provided Olivier with the wherewithall to produce an expensive film
version in the teeth of economic cutbacks, and for the same reason. "We did it
before, and we can do it again."

Stephanie Hughes

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rebecca C Totaro <
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Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jun 1996 22:38:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0448  Re: Milton
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0448  Re: Milton

> Lisa Hopkins <
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>
> Would C.S. Lewis's _Perelandra_ (later reprinted as _Voyage to Venus_) count
> as a loose adaptation of _Paradise Lost_?

_Perelandra_ is much more a loose (or not so loose) adaptation of Dante's
_Paradiso_, as the other parts of the trilogy likewise correspond.

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jun 1996 12:02:21 -0700
Subject:        Wriothesley

I am imformed by two people that Wriothesley is pronounced Risley, and I
believe that also. The point of this is that the Fair Youth of the Sonnets may
be Henry W., but there is no clue to it in his name, which some people like to
pronounce Rosely to compare with the Beauty's Rose of Sonnet no. 1.

One person asked if I knew the rumor that Princess Di was connected to the
Wriothesley family.  Don't know, is it so?
 

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