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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: June ::
Re: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0480.  Wednesday, 26 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Michael Saenger <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Jun 1996 12:25:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Q: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote

(2)     From:   Greg McNamara <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Jun 1996 12:10:26 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0471 Q: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Saenger <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 Jun 1996 12:25:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Q: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote

Dear Leo,

Well, I would be happy to be corrected, but I believe the quote you are
remembering is "Shakespeare is the happy huntingground of all minds that have
lost their balance" (_Ulysses_, Episode 10, section 15, 245:13-14). Joyce was
not only precisely right, he was also self-depricating, since he spent the
previous chapter showing that his interest in Shakespeare was profound,
insightful and comprehensive.

Oh, and Leo- I'm looking for the style sheet.

Michael Saenger

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Greg McNamara <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 Jun 1996 12:10:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0471 Q: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0471 Q: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote

For Professor Leo Daugherty:

Near the end chapter 10 of _Ulysses_ (I don't have my H.W. Gabler edition handy
or I would give the line numbers), Haines offers a half-hearted apology to
half-hearted Mulligan for missing Stephen's discussion of _Hamlet_ (he was in
Gill's buying a copy of Hyde's _Lovesongs of Connacht_). It goes like this:

...O, but you missed Dedalus on Hamlet

Haines opened his newbought book.

-- I'm sorry, he said. Shakespeare is the happy huntingground of all
minds that have lost their balance.

The onelegged sailor growled at the area of 14 Nelson street:

-- England expects...

Buck Mulligan's primrose waistcoat shook gaily to his laughter.

-- You should see him, he said, when his body loses its balance.
Wandering Aengus I call him.

-- I am sure he has an idee fixe, Haines said, pinching his chin
thoughtfully with thumb and forefinger. Now I am speculating what it
would be likely to be. Such persons always have.

____________________________________________________________________
I hope you find this information helpful.  Actually, in Stephen's discussion of
_Hamlet_ in the previous chapter there are several references to the sonnets
which you may find interesting, if not directly relevant to your query.

Greg McNamara
English, West Virginia University
 

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