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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: June ::
Re: Michael Kahn's Comment; Shakespeare/Joyce Quote
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0486.  Thursday, 27 June 1996.

(1)     From:   James Schaefer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Jun 1996 13:01:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0473  Re: Michael Kahn's Comment

(2)     From:   Charles Ross <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Jun 1996 22:03:26 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0480 Re: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <
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Date:           Wednesday, 26 Jun 1996 13:01:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0473  Re: Michael Kahn's Comment
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0473  Re: Michael Kahn's Comment

To Rick Jones:

At 48 I did not think that I was still too young for _anything_, but I guess
I'm supposed to be to young to have been trained in and still find value in the
techniques of New Criticism. (But then my advisor was a old [and wise] man).
Not all New Critics were either pompous twits or fools, nor were their insights
incompatible with today's multiple layers of understanding.  In R.P. Blackmur's
1942 essay, "Language as Gesture," he defines the titular phrase as "the
outward and dramatic play of inward and imaged meaning" -- about as vague and
touchy-feeling as anything in Acting 100 -- and continues that it is "that play
of meaningfulness among words which cannot be defined in the formulas in the
dictionary, but which is defined in their use together."  When two (or more?)
such meanings clash, the conflict "creates meaning ... by feeling the pang, the
inner bite, of things forced together."  In such conflict of meanings, "I
cannot help thinking somewhere between the two...."  Lots of room here for
multiple insights, multiple meanings, multiple backgrounds brought to bear on
performance -- as long as these understandings have some basis in the text
provided to us.

Jim Schaefer

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Ross <
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Date:           Wednesday, 26 Jun 1996 22:03:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0480 Re: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0480 Re: Shakespeare/Joyce Quote

Thank you for the lovely Joyce quote "Shakespeare is the happy hunting ground
of all minds that have lost their balance." The quote is doubtless the source
of the mad scholar Charles Kinbote's inability to find the phrase "pale fire"
in his Zemblan copy of *Timon of Athens* or to recall it from *Hamlet*, as
Nabokov taught *Ulysses* in the years just before composing his great novel
*Pale Fire* (1962). I'll have more to say on this at the Shakespeare and
Popular Culture conference at Temple Univ. in November.

Query: I've never been to Ithaca. Is there at Cornell an avenue of trees
mentioned in Shakespeare's plays? There is one in *Pale Fire* and I seem to
recall someone telling me it exists in fact.

Charlie Ross
 

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