1996

*Post Script* Call for Papers

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0451.  Saturday, 15 June 1996.

From:           Lisa S. Starks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Jun 1996 02:58:03 GMT
Subject:        *Post Script* Call for Papers

To all Shakspereans:

*Post Script* invites submissions for a special issue on Shakespeare and film.
The editors seek papers that offer fresh and innovative approaches to films of
Shakespeare's plays.  All contemporary critical perspectives are welcome and
encouraged, especially those related to film theory or hypertext.  Interviews
and book reviews relevant to the topic are also requested.  The deadline for
completed papers is November 18, 1996.  Please submit three copies, with author
information on separate pages, to Lisa S. Starks, Department of Literature and
Languages, East Texas State University (as of Sept. 1996, Texas A&M University
at Commerce), Commerce, TX  75429; FAX (903) 886-5980; or EMAIL
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For more information on the journal *Post Script: Essays in Film and the
Humanities,* documentation style, paper length, etc., see the *MLA Directory of
Periodicals* listing or contact me (Lisa Starks) at any of the addresses listed
above.

Qs: Fair Youth; Notes & Queries; Robeson

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0450.  Saturday, 15 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jun 1996 16:14:57 -0700
        Subj:   The Fair Youth

(2)     From:   Leo Daugherty <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 14 Jun 1996 21:47:01 GMT
        Subj:   Query:  Notes & Queries Style Sheet

(3)     From:   Bill Glaser <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Jun 1996 01:10:28 -0400
        Subj:   Request for info


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 13 Jun 1996 16:14:57 -0700
Subject:        The Fair Youth

Can anyone tell me how Wriothesley is pronounced for certain?

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leo Daugherty <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Jun 1996 21:47:01 GMT
Subject:        Query:  Notes & Queries Style Sheet

Dear SHAKSPEReans:

Does anybody happen to have a current version of the NOTES & QUERIES style
sheet at hand?  If so, I'm wondering if you could make me a copy and mail it to
me.  (I'll of course repay for copying and postage.)  Please reply to me at
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.  Thanks.

                                               Leo Daugherty

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Glaser <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Jun 1996 01:10:28 -0400
Subject:        Request for info

If any SHAKSPERean can tell me where to find a recording of Paul Robeson's
"Othello," I'd much appreciate an e-mail message or a posting.

Thanks,

Bill Glaser
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://pages.map.com/~bylli

Re: Two Questions; Milton

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0448.  Saturday, 15 June 1996.

(1)     From:   John W. Mahon <JWM1%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jun 96 17:53:29 EDT
        Subj:   SHK 7.0439 Q: Two Questions

(2)     From:   Lisa Hopkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 14 Jun 96 15:50:00 0BS
        Subj:   Milton


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Mahon <JWM1%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 13 Jun 96 17:53:29 EDT
Subject: Q: Two Questions
Comment:        SHK 7.0439 Q: Two Questions

Thursday, 13 June 1996

Chris Stroffolino asks for advice on journals that publish scholarly reviews of
books on Shakespeare.  THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER welcomes such reviews and
invites submissions and inquiries.  Write to us at the Department of English,
Iona College, 715 North Avenue, New Rochelle, NY 10801.  E-mail address is
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and our fax number is (914) 637-2722.

John W. Mahon
THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER
Iona College

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Jun 96 15:50:00 0BS
Subject:        Milton

Would C.S. Lewis's _Perelandra_ (later reprinted as _Voyage to Venus_) count
as a loose adaptation of _Paradise Lost_?

Productions: AYLI and *King Lear*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0449.  Saturday, 15 June 1996.

(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jun 1996 21:43:51 -0400
        Subj:   Review of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's As You Like It

(2)     From:   Chae Lian Diong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 14 Jun 1996 13:04:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Pittsburgh: KING LEAR


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 13 Jun 1996 21:43:51 -0400
Subject:        Review of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's As You Like It

On June 11, I attended a preview of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's *As
You Like It* at Allentown College in (or near) Spring Valley, Pennsylvania.
Dennis Razze is the director, and the production is set in the eighteenth
century -- in a France reminiscent of Watteau's *Fete in a Park.*  The scenery
is in white silhouette, with three tiers of trees -- the front tier being
mobile and used for comic effect.  Different gates and doors are lowered to
indicate changes in locale, and during one of Ganymede's meetings with Orlando,
a swing is lowered for Ganymede to sport upon.  The costumes are, of course,
eighteenth century -- tricorns and breeches.  Although there is an "upper
stage," it is not extensively used in this production.

The action begins with Oliver (Jonathan Robinson) and Dennis (Kevin O'Donnell)
fencing.  Yes, it's not in the script, but it gives Orlando (Ian Merrill
Peakes) an excuse to complain to old Adam (William Preston) of his poor
breeding.  Rosalind (Callan White) is obviously older than Orlando in this
production -- a fact that perhaps emphasizes her maturity of vision. This older
woman has something to teach the younger Orlando. Nevertheless, Rosalind and
Celia (Elizabeth MacLellan) giggle a little too readily for my taste.  Not
every line demands an onstage laugh.

Mark LaMura plays both Duke Frederick and Duke Senior -- Duke Frederick in your
long, gray wig .  He does an excellent job of presenting (and distinguishing
between) the two older men.  (In last year's Pennsylvania Festival he played
Benedick.)  Touchstone (Terry Burgler) is a man of many different hats, and his
stage business mirrors his parodic function in the production. Alan Coates
plays an aristocratic, well-dressed Jaques (pronounced "Jakes" here). Marc and
Suzanne O'Donnell present a comic Silvius and Phebe.

The music is excellent. Brian Anthony Wilson (Amiens) has an operatic voice,
and the two young pages, Andrew Marsh and Nathaniel Myers,  are perfect. Marsh
also plays a stately Hymen.

The script is judiciously cut. For example,  Ganymede's puzzling lines to
Phebe, "If you will know my house,/'Tis at the tuft of olives here hard  by"
(3.5.74-75), are gone.  Some of the scenes have been rearranged.  Act 2, scene
4, is divided into two parts at line 14 -- and the second part placed later in
the action. Act 3, scene 1, is interpolated into Act 2, scene 7.  I suppose the
director was after a kind of montage effect.  Also, the outlaws remain on stage
while Orlando and Adam pass over (2.6).  (As I recall, Alan Dessen has
suggested this particular staging of 2.6.)

The production runs until June 29. I recommend it-- as well as dinner at the
close-by Spring Valley Inn.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chae Lian Diong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Jun 1996 13:04:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Pittsburgh: KING LEAR

The Unseam'd Shakespeare Company, in association with the University of
Pittsburgh's Theatre Department, presents their production of KING LEAR,
directed by David Pellegrini and starring Bill Caisley in the title role, and
Chae Lian as Cordelia.

Venue: Stephen Foster Memorial Theatre, Oakland
Dates: Previews June 26, 27 and runs June 28-30, July 3, 5-7, 10-13
Times: Wednesday-Saturday @ 8 PM; Sunday @ 2 PM
Tickets: $12 general admission; $6 students & senior citizens

For further information, contact the Box Office (412) 661-0244.

(no subject)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0447.  Saturday, 15 June 1996.

From:           Sydney Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Jun 1996 00:58:01 +0200 (IST)
Subject:        Re: Shylock, Moses and the eagle, original versions

On June 6 Jacob Goldberg asked where in the Talmud one could find the following
story quoted by H. Sinsheimer in his book on Shylock.

"In the Talmud, there is a legend about Moses coming down from Sinai and seeing
an eagle carrying a lamb in its beak.  In a rage, Moses upbraids the eagle for
being about to kill a fellow animal, just when he, Moses, had received the
commandment of God: Thou shalt not kill!  The eagle drops its prey, but comes
down to Moses, asking him to feed its young himself.  At this, the holy man
bares his breast and offers his own flesh to the bird of prey."

"Sefer HaAgadah" by Bialik and Ravnitzky, (Dvir (Hebrew), Tel Aviv, 3d edition
1948) is an indexed compendium of Talmudic tales metaphors and aphorisms, which
I have no reason to believe is not exhaustive. I looked up all the references
where "eagle" and "Moses" appeard on the same page and came up with nothing.
The tale is probably spurious, especially since a good deal the Law given to
the Moses deals with the regulation of animal sacrifice.  The commandment
should read in English "Thou shalt not commit murder", rather than "Thou shalt
not kill".  It seems that the translators of the King James Bible seem to have
taken great pains to maintain the number of words as close to the Hebrew
original as possible and even their order, presumably out of respect for its
sanctity.  In the Hebrew the commandment is stated in a mere two words.  (Such
restraints on the translation would justify using the best English wordsmiths
around - lending weight to the proposition that Shakespeare was on the team.)

The Book of Exodus gives the account of Moses' descent from Sinai. Moses was
enraged when he saw that the Children of Israel had contravened the injunction
against graven images, and a great deal of killing went on. When G-d thought
about destroying the stiff-necked nation Moses offered himself in their place:
"Erase me from your Book".

Quoting sources is a solid Rabbinic tradition going back 2000 years, as is
adherence to rules of derivation.  Therefore I would suggest that Sinsheimer's
failure to supply tractate and page imply that there is none. On the other
hand, maybe it wasn't an eagle but some other bird.  No one I have asked has
heard of the story but I will keep looking.

Incidentally, the reference to the Ten Commandments has relevance to the recent
discussion on Original Versions.  Some of the members of the list may not be
aware that the Commandments appear twice in the Five Books: once in Exodus and
again in Deuteronomy.  Now the very name of the fifth book gives witness to the
fact that it is a recapitulation for the Children of Israel before they enter
the Land of Canaan of their history and their wanderings in the wilderness.  It
would therefore seem clear that the version of the Commandments in Exodus is
"original" and the that in Deuteronomy is the 40 year old memory of the 120
year old Moses, right? Wrong!  The Rabbinic tradition is quite firm about both
versions having been uttered in the same breath at Sinai, and have equal and
congruent weight and significance.

To come down from the Heavenly Sublime to the earthly sublime, The early
version of Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy had, for me, a compelling
beauty of its own.  Unfortunately, my archiving system has is such that I
wasn't able to find it among my Shaksper folders. Can someone remind what date
it was posted?

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