1996

Re: Volpone Video; Scamels and Skim-alls

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0411.  Monday, 3 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 02 Jun 1996 09:38:04 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0409  Re: Volpone Video

(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 02 Jun 1996 23:28:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0406  Re: Texts

(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 03 Jun 1996 16:32:06 -0400
        Subj:   Scamels and Skim-alls


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 02 Jun 1996 09:38:04 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 7.0409  Re: Volpone Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0409  Re: Volpone Video

Donald Wolfit made a sterling Fox on BBC in the late fifties; I have since been
unable to imagine a Volpone without those eyebrows and those cheekbones, let
alone that blueberry cordial of a voice so capable of conniving and beguiling.
His eyes could be cold as any but always held a hint of vulnerability that lent
depth to villainy, especially useful instruments for roles such as the devil
mayor in von Kleist's *Der Zerbrochene Krug*.

I was an assitant assistant assistant stage manager then, and remember the
theatrical knight's careful inspection of the set and everyone else's props
before performances. One evening I got to hold his umbrella for him on the walk
back to the Caledonian Hotel with his wife Rosalind Iden, and in my pimply
adolscence replied to his inquiry about how I enjoyed the play with a
precocious "Well, it isn't really the best translation, is it?"---to which he
replied, grabbing his brollie from me, "Nonsense! It's brilliant!". This
attitude to the public's attempt to untheatricalize the theatre has stayed
with me, I'm glad to say.

What colour left the stage when Sir Donald died.

        Harry Hill

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 02 Jun 1996 23:28:17 -0400
Subject: 7.0406  Re: Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0406  Re: Texts

David Lindley writes:

>A limit case might be the famous 'scamels' that Caliban promises to get for
>Stephano and Trinculo. No-one knows what they are; it's the only known use of
>the word. Purely pragmatically one might think that this is a misprint,
>deriving perhaps from scribe or compositor mistranscribing the 'original'.
>Hypotheses are legion. . . .

I was reading Thoreau's *Cape Cod* a few weeks ago and noticed the word "skim
all" for an oyster shell -- as I recall -- that's used for skimming. Is it
possible that "scamel" is a form of "Skimall"-- i.e., oyster.  So the "Young
scamels from the rocks" (2.2.172) would then be young oysters.

Frank Kermode's note (Arden ed.) reads in part: "It is not yet impossible that
this tedious argument will be settled by evidence that scamel is after all a
shellfish" (68).  What we need is a British (rather than American) use of
"skimall" for oyster and a variant spelling "scamel."

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 03 Jun 1996 16:32:06 -0400
Subject:        Scamels and Skim-alls

In my last posting on scamels and skim-alls, I suggested that "skim-alls" were
oysters. But let me quoted the passage from *Cape Cod* in volume 4 of *The
Writings of Henry David Thoreau* (Boston: Hougton Mifflin, 1906): "their women
had got a better skimmer than they {in italics, i.e., peddlars} could make, in
the shell of their clams; it was shaped just right for this purpose.--They call
them 'skim-alls' in some places" (86).

Now that I look at this passage closely, it seems a good bet that the
"skim-alls" are the shells of the clams, not the clams themselves, and
certainly NOT oysters!  Of course, synecdochically, "skim-all" might refer to a
clam with a certain kind of shell.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Shakespeare's Hebrew: Farewell

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0410.  Sunday, 2 June 1996.

From:           Florence Amit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 02 Jun 1996 00:20:51 +0300
Subject:        Farewell

Dear SHAKSPERians,

I must say farewell to you. The sort of additions that I have been able to make
to your discussions whether desired or not, will cease. I wish to return to my
creative work.  I have made an effort to inform you that it is to your benefit
to investigate Shakespeare's Hebrew: the folklore and the words. I propose that
a kind of open lexicon be available in the electronic conference for the
additions and the organization of entries and with ready access to all. With
the right computer technology this need not be a too time consuming project for
the Hebraist who will be editor. Of course any purpose beyond the modest
interpreting of texts must be suspect. No authorship controversy should mar the
straight-forward investigations of meanings. However it may be viable to refer
to Hebrew writings and historical personages in a restricted way. I will
cooperate with any one who desires it in order to get this service started. It
is a very suggestive topic.  Since the writing of my listserve essay I have
noticed many additional words. Like, for instance a meaning for Banquo. In
Hebrew it is Ben Cho meaning 'any how', indicating that Macbeth's efforts to
interrupt Banquo's dynasty is in vain. It is certainly an ironical comment and
one worth knowing.

My more important  project which is to see a revised version of "The Merchant
of Venice" actually produced must I guess, be taken to another forum. I hope
that I will be still alive when it comes to pass. If any of you care to read
some of my arguments on the matter they may find a few in the defunct
Shakespeare Web, Interpretations section.  Query: Mar. 8, 1996 "Why take a
pound of flesh ..."  (I am Pericles in these discussions because of an
unwelcome posting.) and  Query: Feb.5, 1996 "What are the differences between
the notorious 'blood libel' and Shylock's pound of flesh?" I wish all of you
good luck and thank you for your allowing me to evesdrop on the professors.

                                                  Florence Amit

Re: Shakespeare Parodies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0408.  Sunday, 2 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Terry Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 12:09:13 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare Parodies

(2)     From:   Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 11:52:58 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0407  Qs: Shakespeare Parodies

(3)     From:   Doyne Mraz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 18:03:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0407 Q: Shakespeare Parodies


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terry Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 12:09:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare Parodies

W. S. Gilbert (sans Sullivan) wrote a superior *Rosencrantz and Guildenstern*
long before Tom Stoppard.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 11:52:58 -0700
Subject: 7.0407  Qs: Shakespeare Parodies
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0407  Qs: Shakespeare Parodies

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

This message is directed at Michiko  Suematsu, regarding his recent query about
Shakespeare parodies.  Our indefatigable Hardy Cook is quite correct to
indicate the SHAKSPER Listserve Spinoff Bibliography.  Some other works that
might be of use are:

Cohn, Ruby. *Modern Shakespearean Offshoots*.  Princeton: Princeton University
Press, 1976.  A classic early statement.

McKernan, Luke and Olwen Terris, eds. *Walking Shadows:  Shakespeare in the
National Film and Television Archive*. London: British Film Institute
Publishing, 1994.  A remarkable book, listing many parodies and burlesques that
happen to be in the British Film Institute.

Michael Dobson also edited unit 22 of the *Shakespeariana* microfiche
collections, which is titled Adaptations and Acting Editions--distinctly worth
a look.

Finally, I urge you to be cautious in your use of the term "parody" as that
term tends to get sticky.

                Good luck!

                Regards,
                        Bradley Berens
                        Dept. of English
                        UC Berkeley

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Doyne Mraz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 18:03:44 -0400
Subject: 7.0407 Q: Shakespeare Parodies
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0407 Q: Shakespeare Parodies

What do you have?  Do you want things like "The Abridged Shakespeare"?
--AKTR

Re: Volpone Video

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0409.  Sunday, 2 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 09:54:32 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0407  Q: Volpone Video

(2)     From:   Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 17:21:36 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0407 Q: Volpone Video

(3)     From:   John F. Keogh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 2 Jun 1996 12:04:21 +1000
        Subj:   Re: Volpone Video


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 09:54:32 -0800
Subject: 7.0407  Q: Volpone Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0407  Q: Volpone Video

In reply to Jesus Cora, there is a superb French film of Volpone, with a full
Comedie Francaise cast including the great Louis Jouvet as Mosca and Harry
Bauer as Volpone, made in 1938 or so. This is the Stefan Zweig adaptation
re-adapted by Jules Romains, and it's an absolute knockout. It's available from
Facets in Chicago--or at least it was several years ago.

Stephen Orgel
Department of English
Stanford University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 1 Jun 1996 17:21:36 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0407 Q: Volpone Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0407 Q: Volpone Video

The only Jonson drama available on video (to my knowledge) is of Volpone, and
in two versions.  There is a French production from 1939, that has a charming
Volpone and adds a prologue to the play;  the video transfers I've seen of this
film, however, are of very poor quality.  And there is Joseph Mankiewicz's free
adaptation of the play, *The Honey Pot* (1967), with Rex Harrison (as Mr. Fox)
and Cliff Robertson (as Mr. McFly); Maggie Smith plays the Celia character.
*The Honey Pot* strays far from the play at the end, but it captures some of
the decadent spirit of Jonson's work.  Both videos were available a while back
from Commedia dell'Arte.

About three years ago, videos were available of Cleveland State's production of
Jonson's *Oberon*.  This was a very enjoyable production of the masque, and the
tape also included some commentary on masquing.

Jonsonians will also be interested to know that *The Spanish Lady*, Elgar's
unfinished opera based upon Jonson's *The Devil is an Ass,* was available as a
bonus CD with a recent issue of *BBC Music Magazine* (volume 4, no. 2).  This
is the only recording of this work.

I hope this is helpful,
Douglas Lanier

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John F. Keogh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 2 Jun 1996 12:04:21 +1000
Subject:        Re: Volpone Video

I think the B.B.C. may have "The Alchemist" on tape.

A very funny play and an excellent production as I remember.

Qs: Shakespeare Parodies; Volpone Video

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0407.  Saturday, 1 June 1996.

(1)     From:   Michiko  Suematsu <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 31 May 1996 10:38:34 +0900
        Subj:   Shakespeare's parodies

(2)     From:   Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 31 May 1996 15:34:55 UTC+0100
        Subj:   Q: Any Volpone on video?


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michiko  Suematsu <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 May 1996 10:38:34 +0900
Subject:        Shakespeare's parodies

Dear SHAKSPERians,

I'm in the process of listing up the modern parodies and adaptations of
Shakespeare such as Bond's Lear and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.  I
was wondering if you might suggest any title (plays, novels, poems, or any
written texts).  The recommendation of any book which deals with this area
would be also greatly appreciated.

Many  thanks,
Michiko Suematsu
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[You should probably start with these two files on the SHAKSPER Fileserver:

  SPINOFF  BIBLIO     A bibliography of poems, novels, plays, and films
                        inspired by Shakespeare's life and works.Begun by
                        Lawrence Schimel; updated by Hardy Cook.
                        Additions welcome.
  CHARACTR BIBLIO     A bibliography of works in which Shakespeare
                        figures as a character.  Begun by Lawrence
                        Schimel; updated by Hardy Cook.  Additions welcome.

To order, send the following to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.:
GET SPINOFF BIBLIO
GET CHARACTR BIBLIO

--HMC]

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 May 1996 15:34:55 UTC+0100
Subject:        Q: Any Volpone on video?

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Does any of you know of any version of *Volpone*, or, indeed, any play by
Jonson, that is available on video?

Thanks.

J. Cora
U. of Alcala de Henares
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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