1997

King John in NZ

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0293.  Friday, 28 February 1997.

From:           Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 23:30:08 +1300 (NZDT)
Subject: 8.0284  RE: various
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0284  RE: various

Have just seen King John. Open air production in Wellington NZ. One of
an annual series of plays by the university. Nice to note that the
audience were mostly young; possibly largely English students (about 200
on the night I went; the season is about three weeks).I am reminded by
such nights that S. does the educating he always does so well, whether
he was university trained or not.

The Dell behind the Botanical house is very well suited to S. This
production utilised all the natural features of the place effectively
with very good lighting effects. My own particular interest was, as
always, the music. Began with rebec and cornamuse but it sounded as if
they were playing Phillip Brownlee compositions (the cornamuse player).
That seemed a bit of a strange thing to do with period instrument and
did not work either, because the cornamuse is not really an outdoor
instrument. The balance was not convincing. Phillip should have used
krumhorn or even recorder which he is something of an expert on. Scoring
always depends on whether you go for Elizabethan music which S was more
likely to have used in his productions, or 12th century instrumental
(minstrel music?) The singers of sacred music were effectively scattered
through the production (eg wedding of Louis and the English princess).
Mostly they sang well and added good atmosphere.  The most spectacular
effect was achieved with a set of large Japanese drums played by a well
schooled team; and used with great effect in the later battle scenes.

Finally the use of electric guitar was innovatively done. It was used
more as a sound effect box with its screaming and wailing adding to the
drums with surprisingly good results.

KJ is full of great and memorable one liners typical of S (my favourite,
"New made honour doth forget men's names.") Falconbridge has
similarities with other later S characters. His whole job seems to
lighten the play which otherwise would appear to take a grim and
pessimistic view of human nature.  Week willed and vacillating men and
possessive women all fight without scruple. I notice on the internet
that several other productions of KJ are going on. Anyone know how the
music was dealt with?

CFP: Shakespeare Yearbook, X

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0292.  Friday, 28 February 1997.

From:           Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 11:22:24 +0100
Subject:        Re: Call for Papers

Call for Papers

 "Shakespeare and Italy" number of SHAKESPEARE YEARBOOK, X (1999),
         edited by Holger Klein and Michele Marrapodi

Colleagues interested in offering a contribution to "Shakespeare and
Italy" are invited to send a brief outline, preferably by the end of
April 1997, to the general editor Professor Holger M. Klein, Institut
fuer Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Universitaet Salzburg, Akademiestr.
24, A-5020 Salburg, Austria (Tel. +43-662-8044-4422; Fax:
+43-662-8044-613; e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), with a copy to the
co-editor Professor Michele Marrapodi, Facolt=E0 di Lettere, Viale delle
Scienze, Universit=E0 di Palerm= o, 90128 Palermo, Italy (Tel.
+39-91-6560278; Fax: +39-91-421494; e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Contributions to the reception-centred volume may cover any aspect of
reception, notably translations, adaptations, imitations,
parodies/travesties, all forms of intertextual use in the receptor
country's literature, furthermore theatre productions, production
reviews, trends of criticism, the role of Shakespeare in other areas of
the receptor culture (curricula, journalism, advertising, etc.), and the
impact of the country or area and language concerned - i.e. in this
volume, X (1999), the impact of Italy and Italian - on Shakespeare.

A style sheet will be sent out on acceptance of the proposal. Articles
should not exceed 25 pages A4 (including notes), line spacing 1.5, with
all notes as end notes and automated note numbering. Contributions
should be submitted in hard copy and on a disk, using IBM or
IBM-compatible MS DOS Word for Windows 6 (or, at a need, WordPerfect).
All contributions will be double-read before final acceptance.

The deadline for submitting the final contributions to the "Shakespeare
and Italy" number of SHAKESPEARE YEARBOOK, X (1999), is 30 September
1998.

Re: Female Lear; Regan; Shrew; Desdemona's Guilt;

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0290.  Friday, 28 February 1997.

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 04:40:03 -0500
        Subj:   Female Hamlet

[2]     From:   Jameela Ann Lares <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 17:06:27 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Regan

[3]     From:   Kezia Vameter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 05:38:47 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0186 Q: Shrew

[4]     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 13:44:38 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0283 Qs: Desdemona's Guilt

[5]     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 16:37:28 +0200
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet Sleeping with Ophelia...


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 04:40:03 -0500
Subject:        Female Hamlet

A production of King Lear featuring Kathryn Hunter as the King has just
opened in Leicester.

Terence Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jameela Ann Lares <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 17:06:27 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Regan

Thanks to Harry Hill for answers to my posting on Regan.  I've have
forwarded them on to my student.

Jameela Lares
University of So. Miss.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kezia Vameter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 05:38:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0186 Q: Shrew
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0186 Q: Shrew

Joanna Koskinen asked about Baptista and Kate. Coppelia Kahn wrote an
excellent article, I think in MLA or MLN, around 1974 that I think is
crucial for understanding that play.

No arcane reason is needed to explain the young woman's anger if you
recognize, as I believe Shakespeare recognized, that the traditional
power assigned to fathers for marrying off daughters is terribly
oppressive to daughters (women). It's a nasty business, one-half notch
up from selling slaves.

For that reason, to achieve a happy ending, in the comedies, heroines
are usually fatherless, or Daddy is off in the forest. That's necessary
so the female character on stage can be more than a puppet, can truly
act and interact. Somewhere early in Shrew, Baptista makes clear to
Petruchio that Kate will do her own choosing.

You could also look at my 1975 dissertation, not listed in the usual
feminist places.

Kezia Vameter Sproat

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 13:44:38 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 8.0283 Qs: Desdemona's Guilt
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0283 Qs: Desdemona's Guilt

For Michelle Walker:

Check out the following for the variety of feminist readings of D as
subject/object and the text's gender politics generally: Dympna
Callaghan's *Woman and Gender in Renaissance Tragedy*; Irene Dash's
*Wooing, Wedding, and Power*; Shirley Garner's "S's Desdemona," *S
Studies* 9; Gayle Greene's "'This that you call love': Social and Sexual
Tragedy in *Othello,* *Journal of Women's Studies in Literature* 1;
Coppelia Kahn's *Man's Estate*; Carol Neely's *Broken Nuptials*;
Marianne Novy's *Love's Argument*, Mary Beth Rose's *The Expense of
Spirit*; my *The Art of Loving*.  Don't recall offhand, of course,
whether each of the above deals with D's final lines per se.  You should
also be able to find lots of more recent stuff as well -- feminist
Shakespeareans keep returning to that text again and again.

Regards,
Evelyn Gajowski

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 16:37:28 +0200
Subject:        Re: Hamlet Sleeping with Ophelia...

>The best answer ever given on this topic was by John Barrymore, who when
>asked this burning question, replied : " Only in the Chicago company"
>
>Cheers...Mark Mann

This story was on the SHAKSPER Listserv about a year ago and the reply
was "Only in Cleveland".

Cheers, Mark,
John Velz

Qs: MV Film; Norton Ed. CD-ROM

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0291.  Friday, 28 February 1997.

[1]     From:   Troy Swartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 12:08:31 -0500
        Subj:   Qs:  Merchant of Venice

[2]     From:   Kenneth Adelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 13:13:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Norton CD-Rom


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Troy Swartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 12:08:31 -0500
Subject:        Qs:  Merchant of Venice

I have just a short question I'd like to throw out to you all.  I'm
curious if any of you have heard anything about a film production of
Merchant of Venice.  Several months ago I read a short piece on the WWW
about it, but it was relatively vague.  From what I understand it's
taking a gay interpretation; but then again, I may be wrong.  So if any
of you could help, say with director, possible release date, players,
etc. I'd be much obliged.

Thanks,
Troy A. Swartz
Susquehanna University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth Adelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 13:13:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Norton CD-Rom

I read recently in the "Chronicles of Higher Education" that along with
the new Norton version of the complete works is a CD-Rom by Norton.
Has anyone used it yet? Are there advantages to it? If terrific, how so
and where you get it?

Thanks for the info. Ken Adelman

Re: Shakespeare on the Great Lakes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0289.  Friday, 28 February 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 15:05:22 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0282 Shakespeare on the Great Lakes

[2]     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 19:00:41 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0282 Shakespeare on the Great Lakes


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 15:05:22 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0282 Shakespeare on the Great Lakes
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0282 Shakespeare on the Great Lakes

Quite interesting, that note about a young man and his companions
reading and quoting our man on the lakes in the mid-1800's, because it
reminds us into the humility of knowing that our man's stuff seeped
everywhere, with the colonisers and the habitues of the music halls, the
factory floor, the fishmarket, the church and synagogue, the public
pools of towns and cities, debtors' prisons, the workhouse and the
poorhouse.
My mother left school when she was 15, my father at 14. She would quote,
after her favourite "It was the schooner Hersperus, etc...", an amazing
amount of our man, as would my father who went barefoot until 12, slept
in the same bed with three brothers and a sister and became a lab
assistant before leaving to fight the Mersemetrou in 1915 in Egypt, and
could quote "Now is the winter....", "Farewell, a long farewell to all
my greatness", "All the world's stage..." among other chestnuts; later
in his life when he was director of a chemical factory, I heard some of
his workmen exchanging quotations beside the controls of a flash roaster
that prepared sulphuric acid for fertilizers. My Uncle Duncan, a reader
of electric meters, did the same, as did my Auntie Lily who played the
organ at the crematorium and other places where they sing.

Now, the last of these memories are of the fifties, the first of the
forties. To today. My French Canadian neighbours in Montreal do it, my
friends in Norwegian mountain villages do it, I heard a German
hitchhiker get quite far with "Sein oder nicht sein; das ist hier die
Frage". The ones for whom it is far less of a habit have been, I think,
my students, but I intend to ask them tomorrow, and tomorrow.

The young man on the Great Lakes had grown up in a society that played
the piano in the parlor, knew ny heart great swatches of the Book of
Common Prayer including of course many of the Psalms of David, took
"elocution" for as long as they went to school, went to the theatre and
the music hall to see melodrama and hear comics and soubrettes just as
today they watch the soaps, the sitcoms and the emergency-room series of
playlets and get their Holinsheds and laughs from CNN and Dave
Letterman.  Tout ca change....

We'll be OK.

Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Feb 1997 19:00:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0282 Shakespeare on the Great Lakes
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0282 Shakespeare on the Great Lakes

It's not that surprising, in fact you'll find in reading about Edwin
Booth's early career that when he made his grand tour of the Gold Mining
country in the 1850's(?) he got pelted regularly if he tried to improv
his lines, or if he went blank.

Seems even the prospectors had Shakespeare in their homes, along with
the KJ Bible, and knew the stuff by heart, or at least the greatest
hits.  I believe this is before anyone got the bright idea of
expurgating the texts, even.

Andy White
Arlington, VA

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.