Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: February ::
Re: Scansion and Verse
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0189.  Tuesday, 11 February 1997.

(1)     From:   Dale Coye <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 10 Feb 1997 11:55:27 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0181 Re: Scansion-reply

(2)     From:   Lee Gibson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Feb 97 07:00 CST
        Subj:   Blankety verse


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Coye <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 10 Feb 1997 11:55:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0181 Re: Scansion-reply
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0181 Re: Scansion-reply

It was suggested that the R2 line

I know it Uncle, and oppose not myself
Against his will

could be scanned by compressing "know it" to one syllable and placing Uncle in
the second foot.  The problem with this suggestion is that I believe Wright
states (I haven't got the cite in front of me) that an inversion is always
followed by a normal iambic  foot - weak strong, forming a unit of two feet in
the pattern strong-weak-weak-strong.  The first syllable of oppose is not
strong.  Is this a generally accepted rule of inversion, or just Wright's idea?

The second suggestion, to scan it as an epic caesura after Uncle with inversion
of the third foot would work, but I was under the impression that epic caesuras
always resumed with weak-strong after the break, in other words no inversion
would be allowed in the third foot. Indeed, I thought the definition of an epic
caesura was that there were two weak stresses on either side of the break.

Dale Coye
The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
Princeton, NJ

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee Gibson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Feb 97 07:00 CST
Subject:        Blankety verse

The line in question from _Hamlet_ may be scanned as an alexandrine with what
used to be called a "feminine ending" and is more accurately called
"paroxytonic."

Lee Gibson
Southern Methodist University
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.