1997

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0196.  Wednesday, 12 February 1997.

(1)     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Feb 1997 13:53:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0189 Re: Scansion and Verse

(2)     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Feb 1997 18:36:14 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Laertes' Line


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Feb 1997 13:53:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0189 Re: Scansion and Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0189 Re: Scansion and Verse

There are always more variations in scansion than anyone's rules allow for.
Lear's "Never, never, never, never, never!" offers five inversions.  Lady
Macbeth's "That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan" has two lightly stressed
syllables in the fourth foot, and an inversion in the fifth.  It is this sort
of thing that make Shakespeare's lines so rewarding to peak and listen to.
David Richman

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Feb 1997 18:36:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Laertes' Line

Mr. Dwell's question gives me one immediate reponse; even when the words are
written out in full, I assume that a surplus of syllables indicates that at
least 2 or 3 words were meant to be spoken together, as one syllable, a sort of
colloquialism that was not noted by the over-fussy (or, in some eyes,
over-clumsy) printer.

Join "whereof" into one syllable, "is the" into another;  you get something
that looks a mess, but makes sense if it's spoken clearly:

Wher'f he isth' head.

The rest of the line follows, with the "you" as a final weak syllable, "Loves"
being the strong one.

Then if he says he loves you ...

That's all for now,
Andy White
Arlington, VA

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