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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: February ::
Re: Feminist Criticism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0201.  Wednesday, 12 February 1997.

(1)     From:   Phyllis Rackin <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 10:47:14 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

(2)     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 12:01:50 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199 Q: Feminist Criticism

(3)     From:   Anders H Klitgaard <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 18:18:32 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199 Q: Feminist Criticism

(4)     From:   David Skeele <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 13:38:17 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

(5)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 13:53:45 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

(6)     From:   Pat Dunlay <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 15:22:02 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

(7)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Thursday, February 13, 1997
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Phyllis Rackin <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 10:47:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

A good place to start would be Philip Kolin's bibliography *Shakespeare and
Feminist Criticism: An Annotated Bibliography and Commentary* (Garland 1991).

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 12:01:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0199 Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199 Q: Feminist Criticism

On feminist criticism, I learned a good deal from Clamorous Voices,
Shakespeare's Women Today, in which six actors talk about several
roles--including Kate, Lady Macbeth,and Helena.  Also, though not specifically
on All's Well, there is Weyward Sisters, by Callaghan et al. that is most
useful on Romeo nd Juliet--among other plays.  David Richman

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anders H Klitgaard <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 18:18:32 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 8.0199 Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199 Q: Feminist Criticism

Dear Judy Hatcher

I've benefited a lot from Marilyn French's *Shakespeare's Division of
Experience*. In particular I've enjoyed her comments on *Othello*. Couldn't one
say that, strictly speaking, a commentary on *Othello* has to account for the
connection between Othello and Iago, ie explain why the 'innocent' Othello
nevertheless gets ruined by Iago? (One would have thought that innocence proper
was invulnerable to evil.) I have however, so far, only seen Marilyn French
account for this connection. In the months to come, I'll be checking out Helene
Cixous on Shakespeare. Maybe we could write further on this?

Sincerely,
Anders

PS For the record, being a man, I AM somewhat skeptical of feminism...

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Skeele <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 13:38:17 -0500
Subject: 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

Regarding the query about feminist crit. of ALL'S WELL, A good place to start
would be Philip Kolin's *Bibliography of Feminist Shakespeare Criticism.* I
don't remember whether the anthology called *The Woman's Part* (eds. Lenz,
Greene and Neely) has any essays on ALL'S WELL, and the book is a little dated,
but there is sure to be something of value to you in the bibliography.  You
asked for "good" feminist criticism, so I don't know whether you are
considering Marilyn French (who is derided by most feminists) and her
*Shakespeare's Division of Experience."  She does deal fairly extensively with
ALL'S WELL, and if you can stomach the reductive social theory in which she
drapes the entire canon, you will probably find at least a few nuggets of
wonderful insight.  In preparing to direct the production, I was pointed down a
rather feminist road by, of all people, Northrop Frye, in his essay in *Myths
of Deliverance.*  Hope this helps!

                                                        David Skeele

(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 13:53:45 CST6CDT
Subject: 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

You might consider a look at David Haley's _Shakespeare's Courtly Mirror:
Reflexivity and Prudence in All's Well That Ends Well_: it was published in
1993 by Associated University Press. I'm not sure that David would define
himself as a feminist critic, but the book certainly considers issues relevant
to such an approach.

Chris Gordon

(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dunlay <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Feb 1997 15:22:02 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

For feminist criticism of Shakespeare, I'd suggest The Woman's Part, edited by
Carol Thomas Neely and others.  It's a collection of essays, though I don't
recall one on All's Well.  It's a great source.

Pat Dunlay

(7)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Thursday, February 13, 1997
Subject: 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0199  Q: Feminist Criticism

To the above listed works, I would add the following:

Adelman, Janet.  Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origins in
Shakespeares Plays, HAMLET to THE TEMPEST.  New York and London: Routledge,
1992.

Dash, Irene G.  Wooing, Wedding, and Power: Women in Shakespeare's Plays.  New
York: Columbia UP, 1981.

Jardine, Lisa.  Still Harping of Daughters: Women and Drama in the Age of
Shakespeare.  2nd ed.  Totowa, NJ: Barnes & Noble, 1983.  New York: Columbia
UP, 1989.

Neeley, Carol Thomas.  Broken Nuptials in Shakespeares Plays.  New Haven: Yale
UP, 1985.
 

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