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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: February ::
Re: Feminist Criticism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0208.  Friday, 14 February 1997.

(1)     From:   Sara Vandenberg <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Feb 1997 09:21:48 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: All's Well That Ends Well

(2)     From:   Douglas M Lanier <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Feb 1997 12:33:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0201 Re: Feminist Criticism

(3)     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Feb 1997 07:38:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0201 Re: Feminist Criticism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Vandenberg <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Feb 1997 09:21:48 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Re: All's Well That Ends Well

Here are a few feminist essays directly concerned with the play:

Mary Bly, "Women's Erotic Language in Dekker and Shakespeare," _Look Who's
Laughing: Gender and Comedy_, ed. Gail Finney (1994).

Patricia Parker, "All's Well That Ends Well: Increase and Multiply," _Creative
Imitation_, ed. David Quint et al. (1992).

Janet Adelman, "Bed Tricks," _Shakespeare's Personality_, ed. Norman Holland
(1989).

Barbara Hodgdon, "The Making of Virgins and Mothers," _PQ_ 1987.

Lisa Jardine, "Cultural Confusion and Shakespeare's Learned Heroines."
_Shakespeare Quarterly_ 1987.

Sara van den Berg
University of Washington

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Feb 1997 12:33:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0201 Re: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0201 Re: Feminist Criticism

Another useful source might be the anthology of criticism compiled by Deborah
Barker and Ivo Kamps, *Shakespeare and Gender:  A History* (Verso, 1995).  It's
a superb overview of different approaches within the wider rubric of
gender-oriented criticism on Shakespeare.

Cheers,
Douglas Lanier

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Feb 1997 07:38:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0201 Re: Feminist Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0201 Re: Feminist Criticism

Carol Thomas Neeley's BROKEN NUPTIALS also has a good chapter on ALL'S WELL
(which I don't think is in the WOMAN'S PART--though I forget) and a newer
chapter that takes a different kind of feminist approach (linking gender to
rhetoric rather than say genre) is in Christy Desmet's READING SHAKESPEARE'S
CHARACTERS (U_Mass, 1992).....

Chris Stroffolino

(P.S. "Being a man" (you may guess what I am--to paraphrase Don Pedro), I may
be skeptical of feminist critics, but no more than I am of Shakepeare's
strongest female characters, or even Gratiano's "strumpet wind" speech).
 

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