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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: February ::
Re: Mod. Eds.; Burton Ham; MND; Feminism; Ideology
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0235. Tuesday, 18 February 1997.

[1]     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Monday 17 February 1997
        Subj:   SHK 8.0221  Re: Modern Editions;

[2]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Monday, February 17, 1997
        Subj:   Re: Burton's HAMLET

[3]     From:   Dale Lyles < 
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        Date:   Monday, February 17, 1997
        Subj:   Re: MND Discussion

[4]     From:   Chris J. Fassler <
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        Date:   Monday, February 17, 1997
        Subj:   Re: Feminist Criticism

[5]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Tuesday 18 Feb 1997
        Subj:   SHK 8.0230  Re: Ideology


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Monday 17 February 1997
Subject: Re: Modern Editions;
Comment:        SHK 8.0221  Re: Modern Editions;

The Arden is the series of choice at this point, for although the new
Oxford and Cambridge editions are more up to date (both pay substantial
attention to performance history, among other things), they are still in
progress.  The Pelican and Signet are less expensive but dated; the
Signet give you some criticism of each play.  The Folger texts are
adequate, but unless there is a library edition of which I am not aware,
the books are very cheaply printed and not likely to stand up very well
to library wear and tear even if rebound.  You might try identifying an
alum or other benefactor who'd like to give you the whole thing, or
maybe the CD-ROM Arden-your library could probably set it up so that
whoever accessed it would be informed as to the donor's identity.

Dave Evett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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Date:           Monday, February 17, 1997
Subject:        Re: Burton's HAMLET

When Burton did it in Toronto, the voice of Hamlet's father was
distinctively Gielgud's which -with a brilliant light represented the
ghost.  It made some of the other actors, Drake for one ( though not
Cronyn) sound like their mouths were full of mud. It also underlined a
generation gap within and outside of the play.

Mary Jane Miller,
Brock University,

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles < 
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Date:           Monday, February 17, 1997
Subject:        Re: MND Discussion

Adrian Kiernander writes: "This is not the way to a happy or pretty
production, but surely those have passed their use-by date."

Hello?   Whatever our take on husbands who submit their wives to
bestiality in order to gain a new catamite, the fact remains that MND is
a comedy [and I use that in a structural sense], and as far as the main
plot goes, that of Hermia's dilemma, the patriarchal system is
overturned, not sustained.

Thanks though for the new ideas.  I think it's OK to scare an audience,
and we may be able to do that with these insights.   You didn't mention
where Montrose's work can be found.

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris J. Fassler <
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Date:           Monday, February 17, 1997
Subject:        Re: Feminist Criticism

Anders Klitgaard writes, "For the record, being a man, I AM somewhat
skeptical of feminism..."

For the record, I am a man (my spouse's skepticism notwithstanding), and
I am no more skeptical of feminism than I am of any other
theory-probably less so.

Regards,
--Chris

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Tuesday 18 Feb 1997
Subject: Re: Ideology
Comment:        SHK 8.0230  Re: Ideology

Paul Hawkins's argument requires 'aesthetic' considerations somehow to
float free of economic/political imperatives. Of course. Isn't this what
'the aesthetic' was invented for? History meanwhile suggests that
'Transcendence' is written on the banner of all self-respecting
colonialist projects. The imposition of one culture on another is
usually undertaken in the name of 'humanity'. Can we have forgotten than
already?

Terence Hawkes
 

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