Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: February ::
Re: DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0259.  Saturday, 22 February 1997.

[1]     From:   James Schaefer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 21 Feb 1997 14:28:34 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0250  DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question

[2]     From:   Miles Edward Taylor <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 21 Feb 1997 17:18:11 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0250 DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 21 Feb 1997 14:28:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0250  DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0250  DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question

"Has anyone heard ..." the lines in AYLI delivered in such a way as to
suggest a lesbian relationship among the sisters.

Yes, to the point of tedium:  it seems to be the new orthodoxy.  Fine,
if you want to shade the characters in that direction; it gives a
different cast to the sisters' relationship later, when Rosalind gets
hot about Orlando.  But does it reveal anything else about either.

Jim Schaefer

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Miles Edward Taylor <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 21 Feb 1997 17:18:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 8.0250 DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0250 DC's Shakespeare Theatre's AYL and a Question

I just taught AYLI, and we in fact looked closely at the idea that
there's some distinct homoeroticism between Rosalind and Celia.  Besides
the lines you cite, there is Celia's irrational distress at Rosalind's
love for Orlando, which dissolves immediately upon the entrance of
Oliver.  But for most of the play, Celia strikes me as a jealous lover.

Miles Taylor
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.