1997

Re: Parallel Scenes; Drab; Branagh's *Ham*; Osric's

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0179.  Friday, 7 February 1997.

(1)     From:   Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 10:06:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0166   Parallel Scenes

(2)     From:   Paul Worley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 23:45:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0124 Re: A Very Drab

(3)     From:   Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Feb 1997 11:50:21 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0168  Re: Branagh's *Hamlet*

(4)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 05 Feb 1997 22:03:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0171  Qs: Osric's Eggshell

(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 10:06:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0166   Parallel Scenes
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0166   Parallel Scenes

>A friend wants to present two parallel scenes at a spring celebration of
>Shakespeare for the entire college community.  One scene would be from a
>Shakepeare play and the very same scene would be from a modern offshoot. . In
>addition to directing student-actors in the two scenes, she would like to show
>screened versions of the two scenes. What won't work are general offshoots that
>do not have a close parallel scene. For the modern scene, she will need a
>script and permission to use it.
>
>One obvious choice would be a scene from *Rom.* and a parallel scene from
>*Westside Story.* Scripts and films are available for both versions. But *Rom*
>and *West-Side Story* may be too familiar for the intended audience.
>
>Her question: what OTHER plays would work?  Are there other "sets" where a Shn
>scene and an offshoot's scene would match? Are scripts available at a
>reasonable cost? Are videotapes available?
>
>If you can suggest not only particular offshoots but also particular scenes,
>that would be very helpful.
>
>Many thanks for your help,
>Bernice W. Kliman

What about Twelfth Night and the rock opera "Your Own Thing" made from it? Also
Two Gentlemen and the rock opera made from it.  Apt to be expensive There's
Macbeth and the gangster movie Men of Respect.

Norman J. Myers, Professor
Bowling Green State University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Worley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 23:45:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0124 Re: A Very Drab
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0124 Re: A Very Drab

<< A woman who talked a lot was usurping  male discursive power, hence one
could extrapolate that she usurped other male  power, like sexual
assertiveness. Peter Stallybrass writes that, "The >>

I know members of the "Christian" church here in Savannah, Ga. 1997 whose
practice is that no women in the congregation pray aloud in the presence of
males.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Feb 1997 11:50:21 -0500
Subject: 8.0168  Re: Branagh's *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0168  Re: Branagh's *Hamlet*

I haven't seen the film but offer a general observation re the music.

We have to fault the producer/director who controls how much music, what kind
of music, how loud and when, not the composer who simply offers what he has to
the sound mix as it proceeds. The producer (almost always) with the director
(sometimes) make this sort of final decision in film and television. Moreover,
the prioducer chooses the composer .

There were times in both Branagh's and Olivier's HV when I wanted the orchestra
to fall silent and the words and actions to do the work - but I fault Branagh
and Olivier not their composers for those moments and I must admit that there
were times when I enjoyed the music in both films. I sometimes play short
extracts from both sound tracks in a class.

Mary Jane Miller,
Brock University,

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 05 Feb 1997 22:03:59 -0500
Subject: 8.0171  Qs: Osric's Eggshell
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0171  Qs: Osric's Eggshell

 Jameela Ann Lares asks:

>Was there any particular style of hat intended for Osric in _Hamlet_ 5.2?

See Andrew Gurr, <italic>The Shakespearean Stage 1574-1642</italic>, 3rd ed.,
pp. 2-3, with a picture of Giles Brydges wearing "the kind of hat that Osric
flourished" (3). Gurr cites Roy Strong, <italic>The English Ikon</italic>, no.
148.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Various Announcements

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0178.  Friday, 7 February 1997.

(1)     From:   Karen Bamford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 13:24:41 -0400
        Subj:   Call for Papers

(2)     From:   Irene Ludman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Feb 1997 13:23:29 GMT
        Subj:   CALL FOR PAPERS : IWCS'97

(3)     From:   Libby G Bradford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 19:30:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   CFP: Conference on Gender

(4)     From:   Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Feb 1997 08:08:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   ACTER Currently in Illinois

(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Bamford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 13:24:41 -0400
Subject:        Call for Papers

 ************ CALL FOR PAPERS **********

Proposed topic for a special session at the MLA Convention in Toronto, Dec.
1997:

*War and Gender in the Plays of John Fletcher*

How does Fletcher represent gender--including the eroticization of male
bonds--in relation to the military world?  2-page proposals or 12-page papers
by 15 March.

(PLEASE CROSS-POST)

Karen Bamford
Mount Allison University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Irene Ludman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Feb 1997 13:23:29 GMT
Subject:        CALL FOR PAPERS : IWCS'97

CALL FOR PAPERS

1st INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON COMPUTATIONAL SEMIOTICS

26th - 27th May, 1997
P


Milton Transcription Project

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0176.  Friday, 7 February 1997.

From:           A.E.B. Coldiron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 03 Feb 1997 08:15:16 -0500
Subject:        Milton Transcription Project

(Please cross-post this call for volunteers.)

Dear Readers of SHAKSPER,

THE MILTON TRANSCRIPTION PROJECT (MTP) is dedicated to making all of John
Milton's poetry and prose available for public access on the Internet. Although
most of Milton's poetry is available in modernized forms, the MTP is preparing
more accurate electronic facsimiles of the early editions of Milton's poems.
In addition, most of the English and Latin prose--along with a great deal of
fascinating Miltoniana--remains to be done.  We invite you to join us in
providing accurate scholarly transcriptions of these texts.

Volunteers may transcribe as much or as little as they wish; each transcription
will be proofread, formatted, checked, and refereed.  We shall acknowledge any
significant contribution, and all accepted transcriptions will be credited by
name.

The MTP, currently supported by Milton-L, _Milton Quarterly_, the Department of
English at Texas Tech University, the Computer Writing and Research Laboratory
at the University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Richmond's
web-server, is the joint creation of volunteers from more than 24 colleges and
universities in half a dozen countries.  In order to volunteer or to receive
more information, please contact either Professor Hugh Wilson (MTP Editor;
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or Professor A.E.B. Coldiron, (MTP Internet Liaison;
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

The only requirements are diligence, concern for accuracy, and the ability to
type with one or more fingers.  Volunteer: earn the intangible reward of "those
whose publisht labours advance the good of mankind" (_Areopagitica_, 1644).

Re: Ideology (Various)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0177.  Friday, 7 February 1997.

(1)     From:   Paul Hawkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 14:11:02 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0167 Transcendence and History

(2)     From:   Sean K. Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 05 Feb 1997 10:12:43 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0167  Re: Transcendence v. Historicism

(3)     From:   Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 05 Feb 1997 14:51:04 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0152  Re: Ideology: Category Genes


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Hawkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Feb 1997 14:11:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0167 Transcendence and History
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0167 Transcendence and History

In order to maintain his position (which for convenience he labels in his
recent post generically "historicism"), Gabriel Egan seems to need to convert
defenders of Shakespeare's transcendence into deniers of history. I am sorry
not to oblige him.

The distinction in my post is between different relationships to history, one
that seems to mark those who claim that Shakespeare is time-bound, one that I
imagine underpins those who affirm Shakespeare's timelessness.

To assert that Shakespeare transcends his time does not mean that one denies he
was there in the first place.  And it sets no limit on one's curiosity about
the past or one's belief in its critical importance.

Similarly, to believe in "common humanity," "human nature,"  "human
universals," is not to deny cultural difference.

Paul Hawkins

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean K. Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 05 Feb 1997 10:12:43 -0800
Subject: 8.0167  Re: Transcendence v. Historicism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0167  Re: Transcendence v. Historicism

> One cannot be for transcendence and historicism.

Actually, Gabriel, Sartre's view of consciousness transcending itself proceeds
by a rather linear process from Heidegger's insistence on the historicity of
Dasein.

Cheers,
Sean.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 05 Feb 1997 14:51:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0152  Re: Ideology: Category Genes
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0152  Re: Ideology: Category Genes

Thank you Dan Lowenstein for a clear and concise description of the
relationship between ideas and the plays which embody them.  I was also
intrigued by your comparison to the field of law.

However, you may want to be aware that teachers have other reasons for
highlighting "bits and pieces" of Shakespeare in the classroom, as opposed to
always dealing with whole plays, than to focus on the ideas revealed in those
"bits and pieces."  One may do it to examine a particular dramaturgical
technique.  I, for example, frequently focus on the events surrounding the
murder of Duncan to explore what effects are achieved by Shakespeare's curious
plotting choice of not staging the killing, the single event of the story which
cannot be omitted and still retain the essence of the story.  By doing so, with
a play which most of my students already know, my students can readily see how
the artist's choice of what to show and what to tell about allows him to direct
our attention not to the killing but to the mind of the person doing the
killing.  I might also take a scene to explore varieties of ways of staging the
scene and what values are derived through such choices.  I frequently devote a
class period or more to language, choosing scenes which provide prose, blank
verse, rhymed couplets, and mixtures, scenes with stichomythia,assonance,
alliteration, etc., as well as commonplaces and soliloquys.

I'm sure others could provide you with many more values to be gained from a
"bits and pieces" approach. Nevertheless, I thank you again for a well stated
position on the play/idea relationship.

Ed Pixley
SUNY-Oneonta

Fahrenheit Theatre Company's Romeo and Juliet

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0175.  Tuesday, 4 February 1997.

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 03 Feb 1997 22:29:32 -0500
Subject: 8.0166  Fahrenheit Theatre Company's Romeo and Juliet
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0166  Fahrenheit Theatre Company's Romeo and Juliet

Fahrenheit's production of <italic>Romeo and Juliet</italic> will open at the
Jarson-Kaplan Theater in the Aronoff Center for the Arts in beautiful downtown
Cincinnati  (Walnut Street between 6th and 7th Streets) on Thursday, February
6, at 8:00 PM. The show is directed by Warner Crocker, Artistic Director of
Pegasus Players in Chicago, and features dueling Juliets: Marni and Lisa
Penning. It runs until February 16, Wed-Sat 8PM, Sun 7PM, Sat matinee 2PM. For
more information check: http://www.iac.net/~marjason. For tickets call
513-214-SHOW.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

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