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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Richard III, Lover
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0024.  Wednesday, 8 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 1997 15:46:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0017 Re: Richard III, Lover

(2)     From:   Christine Jacobson <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 1997 14:39:52 -0700
        Subj:   Jimmy - January 3rd - Looking for Richard III

(3)     From:   Adrian Kiernander <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Jan 1997 13:46:44 +1100 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0013  Re: Richard III, Lover

(4)     From:   Laura Blanchard <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Jan 1997 09:04:11 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0017 Re: Richard III, Lover

(5)     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Jan 1997 12:55:42 -0500
        Subj:   Richard 111


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 1997 15:46:48 -0500
Subject: 8.0017 Re: Richard III, Lover
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0017 Re: Richard III, Lover

A Voice from Naive Land:

Kathleen Brookfield's comment on RIII wooing scene can also usefully be read in
the light of the fact that the female monarch on the throne when the play was
written was NONE OF THESE, but militantly unmarried. Thus the scene, besides
being excellent theatrically, may have served in real life to validate
Elizabeth's refusal to marry. Here again is Brookfield:

<< When we compare the two queens in  similar situations, we see that in the
transition from the feudal Plantagenet times to the rise of the Tudor
monarchy, royal women have lost what little power they might have had and
become more passive in male power games. [Here a contrast to Elizabeth I may
have been intended and surely easy to perceive for contemporary audience. ]
Ann accepts the role as a marriage pawn with less protest than Margaret did
in an earlier time and place.  [Here contrast Eliz I ] Another reason for seeing
Richard's proposal to Ann scene as more than something to move the plot.

[Yes, Absolutely!!!]

The "wailing queens" scene, later in the play, supports the idea that the women
feel powerless in the wake of the unfolding tragic events. But Margaret's
cynical speeches seem to imply that they have constructed their own fates.
 >>

Restraining myself from going on, but in general, the tragedies show weak women
and the comedies strong ones, and it's no accident that most comic heroines
start out with no fathers, or fathers exiled in the forest, or fathers who say,
"Kate will choose her own husband."

Small observation re. Lear: It's probably been noted that, a couple of
centuries before Shakespeare, Francis of Assissi took his clothes off
(according to a contemporary book of saints that fell into my hands yesterday)
in public, as does Lear, in an effort to achieve honesty. Possible influence?

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Jacobson <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 1997 14:39:52 -0700
Subject:        Jimmy - January 3rd - Looking for Richard III

I noticed your query regarding what you perceived as a discrepancy between
Richard III's statement that he was one too "rudely stamped" to play at love,
or, at least, to be a lover and his later statement of amasement at winning
over Lady Anne with his wooing.  As far as I can discern from these comments by
Richard III, Richard believed he had to play a game of life different from his
contemporaries, because he saw himself and indeed I believe was perceived as,
"unnatural".  He didn't love Lady Anne, did he?  He just conned her, as his
statement of amazement reveals.  Richard's wooing of Lady Anne was just a part
of his "game" plan.  Do you agree?

Happy New Year to all members of SHAKSPER!    Christine Jacobson

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adrian Kiernander <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Jan 1997 13:46:44 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 8.0013  Re: Richard III, Lover
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0013  Re: Richard III, Lover

Discrepancy? What discrepancy? Richard says he is not shaped for sportive
tricks nor made to court an amorous looking glass and cannot prove a lover in
I,1. When his subsequent wooing of Anne (all the world to nothing) is
successful he appears surprised, and insists on the improbability of what has
happened. He then somewhat changes his tune about his appearance-- "I do
mistake my person all this while: Upon my life she finds, although I cannot,
myself to be a marvellous proper man..." and plans to buy the (amorous?)
looking glass he has previously said he was not made to court.

So no necessary inconsistency, merely some character development when something
happens to him that has never happened before.

Of course, a production may well choose to order these things differently.

Adrian Kiernander
University of New England

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Blanchard <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Jan 1997 09:04:11 -0500
Subject: 8.0017 Re: Richard III, Lover
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0017 Re: Richard III, Lover

Al Pacino's commitment to increasing Shakespeare's accessibility is reflected
in a viewer's guide and lesson plan to accompany _Looking for Richard_
developed by Youth Media International in cooperation with Fox Searchlight
Pictures. The guide was mailed to members of the National Council of Teachers
of English prior to a screening of the film and a presentation by Pacino and
Hague at the organization's November 1996 conference in Chicago.

Fox Searchlight and YMI have allowed the lesson plan to be adapted for the web
and it can be viewed at the Richard III Society's web site section on the
Pacino play. The direct URL for the lesson plan is

http://www.webcom.com/blanchrd/lesson1.html

This plan may not be to the taste of all SHAKSPEReans, but some teachers,
especially at the secondary level, may find it a useful teaching tool.

Regards,
Laura Blanchard

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(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Jan 1997 12:55:42 -0500
Subject:        Richard 111

Virginia M. Byrne writes of Richard 111 'I am not sure (typical male) that he
REALLY believes it'. Smashing! Now: does Lady Macbeth (typical female) REALLY
faint?

T. Hawkes
 

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