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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture (Children)
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0038.  Saturday, 11 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Lisa Hopkins <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 Jan 97 13:39:00 GMT
        Subj:   Shakespeare as Character

(2)     From:   Ron Dwelle <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 Jan 1997 10:42:33 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0033  Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <
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Date:           Friday, 10 Jan 97 13:39:00 GMT
Subject:        Shakespeare as Character

The cartoon series _Transylvania Pet Shop_ (my four year old son's current
favourite) has a villainous actor /director called William Waggledagger, who
wears doublet and hose.  He competes with the hero, Dr Zitbag, for the love of
the twin Exorsisters.

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <
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Date:           Friday, 10 Jan 1997 10:42:33 -0500
Subject: 8.0033  Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0033  Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture

Regarding kids' stories, my children (ages 9 & 11) love a PBS afternoon show
named _Wishbone_. Wishbone is a talking dog who takes part in re-creations of
famous stories (like Tom Sawyer, Three Musketeers). I'm not tuned into it, but
I've overheard Romeo and Juliet and the Tempest on the show. In the Tempest,
the dog plays Ariel. I'm not sure who the dog plays in R&J.

These shows are 30 minutes long and usually involve some "framing" action, so
the portions of Shakespeare are obviously truncated--all of the Tempest in 22
minutes or so!
 

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