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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture (Children)
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0050.  Tuesday, 14 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Christine Jacobson <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Jan 1997 16:47:34 -0700
        Subj:   Children's Shakespeare

(2)     From:   Christine Jacobson <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Jan 1997 16:32:40 -0700
        Subj:   My final posting - regards S.Mulder, Dave Evett,


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Jacobson <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Jan 1997 16:47:34 -0700
Subject:        Children's Shakespeare

Terry Gray's comments regarding Children's Literature commencing around 1744
reminded me of something we were taught in Children's Lit class - re Newbury's
Book Selling Shop adjacent to St. Paul's Cathedral in London in the mid 1700's.
 Apparently he was supposed to be one of the first publishers and writers of
stories for children that were specifically for amusement and not didactic
religous or "manners" books.  I have heard of Mary and Charles Lamb's
interpretation of Shakespeare for Children.  Has anyone here heard of Searle
and Willan's "Complete Molesworth" and the chapter on "How to be A Good
Elizabethan"? It's amusing. I can't remember the title of Shakespeare's
childrens' stories for children illustrated by Charles Keeping.  The illus-
trations are excellent and contribute to the value of that volume.  Maybe
Palomar College Library has a reference through the artist.

Also to S. Mulder - I was given Nigeo Marsh as the name of an author that wrote
mystery stories using Shakespeare's plays as plot lines.  (Please pardon my
terrible spelling in my posting submissions.)

Christine Jacobson.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Jacobson <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Jan 1997 16:32:40 -0700
Subject:        My final posting - regards S.Mulder, Dave Evett,

Lisa Hopkins and Ron dwelle mentioned pop cultural sources and Shakespearean
influence.  These cartoon references are neat.  Also, Seinfield's sit com is a
ubiquitous portion of our cable system here in Alberta, Canada and ocassionally
he refers to Shakespeare's characters' dialogue - "Just like the Montagues and
the Capulets...."  and more.  I really wish I had been able to participate
regarding advertising and evidence ofShakespeare as I sell promotional
advertising products to businesses and could have used some nifty ideas.

Dave Evett's Shakespeare and Ideology and public taste's infl. on method of
Beer brewing in "jolly old" is something I printed out for my husband who makes
frequent trips across the pond.

Yes, S.  Mulder, I've become accustomed to Mordecai Richler as one of Canada's
cultural icons.  I read his first novel "A choice of enemies" - very
Checkovianesque, ennui, type of love story and have started St. Urbains but
only got into it a few pages - now I will attempt it again after reading your
comments.  To get this back to Shakespeare - my prof. suggested reading a book
called "One Thousand Acres", a takeoff on King Lear.  It proposes that Lear's
daughters behaved the way they did because they were traumatized by incest.
Also this could be interesting reading.  Salut a Tous! This is such a neat
group.  - Oh, possibly someone looking for family relationships in Renaissance
times could take a look at "The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare". There is a
chapter in their which really discusses the Elizabethean perceptionof family
duty and also refers to a documented incident of Father - daughter relationship
source that Shakespeare might have used for King Lear plot devel.

Christine M. Jacobson.
 

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