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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Shakespearean and Non-Shakespearean Videos
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0080.  Saturday, 18 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Miles Edward Taylor <
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        Date:   Friday, 17 Jan 1997 09:29:57 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0075 Videos: Question and Response

(2)     From:   Kenneth Adelman <
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        Date:   Saturday, 18 Jan 1997 11:07:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0075 Videos: Question and Response

(3)     From:   Richard A. Burt <
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        Date:   Friday, 17 Jan 1997 14:15:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0075  Videos: Question and Response

(4)     From:   Mason West <
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        Date:   Friday, 17 Jan 1997 16:07:54 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0075  Videos: Question and Response

(5)     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Saturday, 18 Jan 1997 14:39:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Non-Shakespearian Videos


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Miles Edward Taylor <
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Date:           Friday, 17 Jan 1997 09:29:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 8.0075 Videos: Question and Response
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0075 Videos: Question and Response

Here at UO, all the BBC productions, including Jacobi's R2, are available at
our library.  If your library does not have them, a hundred others probably do
and you may find some willing to do an interlibrary loan.

Jacobi is wonderful as Richard, and this is one worth seeing.  For the most
part, though, these BBC productions are painfully dull.  The comedies
especially suffer from the reverential treatment.  The Jacobi Hamlet is also
very good, however.

A few notes on the version of "The Changeling" which recently aired on the
Bravo network: besides Hoskins and Grant, the other star--and a real
eye-opener--was Elizabeth McGovern as Beatrice-Joanna.  For me, she was the
best part of the production.  Also, the whole sub-plot from which the play
takes its name, wherein Antonio plays mad to gain access to the madhouse
keeper's wife, was stricken.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth Adelman <
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Date:           Saturday, 18 Jan 1997 11:07:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0075 Videos: Question and Response
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0075 Videos: Question and Response

Yes. Jacobi's RII is available on the BBC version of Shakespeare. Some five or
so years ago, BBC did the complete canon and this was a highlight in that
(Jacobi was also Hamlet in that series).

A good library will have the complete set, at least mine does in Arlington, VA.
Time-Life somehow joined with BBC to market the series, I believe, so it may be
listed that way as well.

Enjoy it! It's wonderful!

Ken Adelman

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <
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Date:           Friday, 17 Jan 1997 14:15:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0075  Videos: Question and Response
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0075  Videos: Question and Response

There are lots and lots of videos available. One place to look for availability
is Ken Rotthwell's Shakespeare on Screen.  Also consult Walking Shadows.  Video
rental stores will often order videos for you.  I just got the Cukor
RomeoandJuliet for 17.00.  Newly relased videos are initially expensive, but
eventually drop to less than 20.00.

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mason West <
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Date:           Friday, 17 Jan 1997 16:07:54 -0000
Subject: 8.0075  Videos: Question and Response
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0075  Videos: Question and Response

Kirk Hendershott-Kraetzer wrote:

    *The Tempest* is available in a variety of
    treatments. . . . John Cassavetes directed the
    lovely *Tempest* which is a 1982 updating of
    the story, set on a Greek island.  I don't
    think it's available any more, but many video
    rental places still stock it.

This version, Tempest (without the definite article), is one of my favorite
'little movies.' While it is a relatively modest production, I would not go so
far as to call it a B-movie as someone earlier labeled it. For one thing -- not
to invite the ire of the Marxists -- it has a bit more class than, say, a
Charles Bronson movie.

The excellent cast includes Cassavettes, Susan Sarandon, Gena Rowlands, Raul
Julia (as a lovable "Calibanos"), and Molly Ringwold in her first film. Paul
Mazursky, not Cassavettes, directed, though the film's story of a man in the
thick of a mid-life crisis, a marriage break-up, and a search for his cultural
roots in Greece very much resembles the sort of films Cassavettes directed and
acted in with cohorts Peter Falk and Ben Gazara (sp?) during the '60s and '70s.

A lot of the wit and charm of this movie comes as much from Cassavettes and his
New York theatrical milieu as it does from Shakespeare, and it's none the less
for it. Mazursky, remarkably, manages to capture most of his denouement in a
well choreographed take of about five minutes while a sultry tango plays on the
soundtrack.

Other treatments of the Tempest include Forbidden Planet and Peter Greenaway's
Prospero's Books. Though the 1956 production of Forbidden Planet predated the
watershed of realistic special effects heralded in 1968 by 2001: A Space
Odyssey, it set some excellent standards that science fictions films were
obliged to follow, and it remains a cult classic today. Walter Pidgeon stars
and Kate Francis plays his cloistered daughter.

Greenaway's Prospero's Books by the controversial artistic British director
Peter Greenaway (best known for his The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her
Lover) is as dark as Paul Mazursky's Tempest is light. I'm not prepared to
comment on Greenaway's deviations from Shakespeare, but this is an important
film to see if you are interested in how Shakespeare has been handled in film
adaptations.

-- Mason West
   
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(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Saturday, 18 Jan 1997 14:39:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Non-Shakespearian Videos

I have seen a wonderful video of "The Duchess of Malfi", with Nigel Terry as
Bosola, although I can't recall where it came from.  I'll ask my prof about it
and get back to you.

Andy White
Now in Arlington, VA
 

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