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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Lady Macbeth; The Mousetrap; Charles's Marginalia
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0104.  Wednesday, 22 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 10:17:16 -0500
        Subj:   Lady Macbeth

(2)     From:   Ed Peschko <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 11:09:14 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0097  Re: Claudius and the Mousetrap

(3)     From:   Derek Wood <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 21:02:01 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0098  Qs: Charles's Marginalia;


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 10:17:16 -0500
Subject:        Lady Macbeth

The question 'Did Lady Macbeth really faint' is not my invention. Nor is it a
joke. It appears as Note DD in A.C.Bradley's momentous 'Shakespearean Tragedy',
published in 1904. Bill Godshalk's stratagem, crediting it to myself, is
clearly an attempt to curry favour. It will not succeed. Nor will poring over
the letters of Abelard and Heloise (oh dear, the sadness of that 'again'!).

T. Hawkes

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Peschko <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 11:09:14 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 8.0097  Re: Claudius and the Mousetrap
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0097  Re: Claudius and the Mousetrap

> Patrick Stewart's version of Claudius, as described by Mark Mann, seems to
> sidestep what is implied by the words, "Give me some light."  This line
> suggests an inner anguish and confusion which, it seems to me, is brought out
> clearly in those performances in which we know Claudius is genuinely disturbed
> by what he sees.

I would also say that the words 'Give me some light.' could imply a tyrant, who
being confronted by a rebel that is resisting his authority, exerting his
authority on *others* by issuing a pointless command.

Or maybe as a sign of strength: 'Give me some light!' -- ie: *I'm* in charge
here, and don't you forget it! Just because Claudius hides that he is disturbed
doesn't mean that he isn't disturbed!

Ed

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Derek Wood <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 21:02:01 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 8.0098  Qs: Charles's Marginalia;
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0098  Qs: Charles's Marginalia;

>In doing research for a dissertation chapter on Renaissance readers of drama, I
>came across this remark in Andrew Gurr's _The Shakespearean Stage_, 3rd ed.:
>"Charles himself read plays, and marked his copies with appreciative comments"
>p. 20. Does anyone, including Prof. Gurr, know where Charles's copies are
>stored or, better yet, whether his comments have ever been reproduced more
>accessibly?
>
>Thanks in advance,
>David Knauer

I would be interested (and surprised) to know if Andrew Gurr had seen any
marked texts or had any sort of ms or holograph data. I take it this is Charles
I. I suspect Prof. Gurr had in mind Milton's remarks in _Eikonoklastes_. Milton
is speaking of policy in Princes, who carefully put pious words in their own
mouths, imitating the right authors: "I shall not instance an abstruse Author,
wherein the King might be less conversant, but one whom we well know was the
Closet Companion of these his solitudes, William Shakespeare; who introduces
the person of Richard the third, speaking in as high a strain of pietie, and
mortification, as is uttered in any passage of this Book; and sometimes to the
same sense and purpose with some words in this place..." (CP, 3, 361). Milton
is interested in Shakespeare's presentation of a king as a "deep dissembler,
not of his affections onely, but of Religion" (362). The idea that Shakespeare
was the "closet companion" of the wretched king has been sometimes misused by
Milton scholars to Shakespeare's disadvantage.

        Best wishes,
        Derek N. C. Wood
        St. Francis Xavier University
 

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