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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Charles's Marginalia
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0106.  Thursday, 23 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Peter C. Herman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 08:40:52 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0104   Charles's Marginalia

(2)     From:   Naomi Liebler <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jan 97 14:36:12 EDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0104  Re: Charles's Marginalia

(3)     From:   Pervez Rizvi <K>
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        Date:   Thursday, 23 Jan 97 9:06:57 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0098  Q: Charles's Marginalia


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter C. Herman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 08:40:52 -0800
Subject: 8.0104   Charles's Marginalia
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0104   Charles's Marginalia

An addendum to Derek Woods' remarks reproduced below. Milton also says that
Charles is reported "a more diligent reader of Poets, then of Politicians . . .
." (CPW, 406), which, given the passage Woods quotes, proves once more the
conflation of poetry and drama in the period.

Peter C. Herman

>I would be interested (and surprised) to know if Andrew Gurr had seen any
>marked texts or had any sort of ms or holograph data. I take it this is Charles
>I. I suspect Prof. Gurr had in mind Milton's remarks in _Eikonoklastes_. Milton
>is speaking of policy in Princes, who carefully put pious words in their own
>mouths, imitating the right authors: "I shall not instance an abstruse Author,
>wherein the King might be less conversant, but one whom we well know was the
>Closet Companion of these his solitudes, William Shakespeare; who introduces
>the person of Richard the third, speaking in as high a strain of pietie, and
>mortification, as is uttered in any passage of this Book; and sometimes to the
>same sense and purpose with some words in this place..." (CP, 3, 361). Milton
>is interested in Shakespeare's presentation of a king as a "deep dissembler,
>not of his affections onely, but of Religion" (362). The idea that Shakespeare
>was the "closet companion" of the wretched king has been sometimes misused by
>Milton scholars to Shakespeare's disadvantage.
>
>        Best wishes,
>        Derek N. C. Wood
>        St. Francis Xavier University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Naomi Liebler <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jan 97 14:36:12 EDT
Subject: 8.0104  Re: Charles's Marginalia
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0104  Re: Charles's Marginalia

Derek Wood and David Knauer are encouraged to consult the Office Books of Henry
Herbert (Charles I's Master of the Revels). Herbert records instances (one
notable one in the case of a play by Massinger) when Charles not only read over
the play-script but commented (harshly, in Massinger's case: "This is too
insolent, and to be changed"). I wouldn't be a bit suprprised if Herbert's
Office Book was among the "sources" Andy Gurr has in mind in making the claim
Mr. Wood finds so unlikely. Herbert's Office Book has been reprinted in modern
spelling and may well be available in your university library. While Herbert's
reporting is admittedly second-hand, it is likely to be reliable, since his
boss's objections might have had dire consequences for a Master of the Revels.
Herbert's annotations to the licensing data for various plays tended to be
rather detailed, for which we should be grateful.

Cheers,
Naomi Liebler

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pervez Rizvi <K>
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Date:           Thursday, 23 Jan 97 9:06:57 GMT
Subject: 8.0098  Q: Charles's Marginalia
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0098  Q: Charles's Marginalia

The introduction to Much Ado in the Riverside edition says that Charles I
altered this play's title to "Beatrice and Benedick" in his copy of F2. I've no
idea where this copy might reside now, but my first guess would be the royal
library at Windsor Castle.
 

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