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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Slings and arrows
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0109.  Thursday, 23 January 1997.

(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 09:54:43 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0093  Re: Slings and arrows

(2)     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 16:02 ET
        Subj:   SHK 8.0087  Q: Slings and arrows


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 09:54:43 -0500
Subject: 8.0093  Re: Slings and arrows
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0093  Re: Slings and arrows

The citations given by Ian Lancashire and Don Foster certainly explain the
conjunction of "slings and arrows."  The passages quoted, however, don't
specifically refer to "the arrows of Fortune," but rather to "Fortune's sling."
Of course, as Cotgrave notes, slings "violently darted" great arrows, and,
perhaps, arrows are implied by "Fortune's sling."

In any case, my thanks to Ian and Don for this information.

Chris Stroffolino's response is on target, but I wouldn't search for a lost
arrow in the way Bassanio suggests.  The second arrow really would be an "arrow
of fortune."

Yours,  Bill Godshalk

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 16:02 ET
Subject: Q: Slings and arrows
Comment:        SHK 8.0087  Q: Slings and arrows

I'd be more inclined to look in the visual iconography of Fortuna for
slings/stings and arrows than in texts; arrows in particular (in the left hand)
would be a clear and easy way to represent _mala fortuna_.  Jean Cousin, _Le
Livre doe Fortune_ (before 1574) gives about 200 different images of the
goddess from many sources; I've seen a splendidly printed translation, ed.
Ludovic Lalanne and trans. H. Mainwaring Dunston, London and Paris 1883.

Iconographically,
Dave Evett
 

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