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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Teaching British to the Englanders
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0111.  Thursday, 23 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Jonathan Hope <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 16:24:24 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: Teaching British to the Englanders

(2)     From:   John Lee <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 17:30:41 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Teaching British to the Englanders


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jonathan Hope <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 16:24:24 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Re: Teaching British to the Englanders

John Lee is more correct when he writes of the 'English' education system than
Gabriel Egan is when he writes of the 'British' one: there is one system in
place in England and Wales, and another in Scotland.  The differences are quite
marked, and can be found throughout both school and university education,
administration, and course contents.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Lee <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jan 1997 17:30:41 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Teaching British to the Englanders

Gabriel Egan points out that he was referring to the British system, and not
`whatever the "English" system is'.  The change of terminology doesn't change
my point -- I don't think anyone who went through the British system would
recognize it from Gabriel Egan's description. Whole texts of Shakespeare are
used in English schools.  (That's a fact?  Even if there isn't a text in the
class, and even if that wholeness -- along the authority, originality --
disappears as you search for it ...)

I used English to narrow down the options a little (though there are large
differences within English schooling) -- for the notion of a British system is
rather monolithic, totalizing. For example, the Scots have a quite different
system of Education, examined by their own examination boards, and incompatible
in some ways with the system at work in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The Northern Irish have a far stronger Grammar School system left intact.  The
Welsh have rather different senses of class and education than the English (and
half the country has a different language).

Small points; my larger question is whether Gabriel Egan's willingness to use
large and imprecise generalizations is in part the product and in part the
sustaining practice of his chosen theory of ideology?

(I did not know that Rhodes Boyston was Minister for Education in the 1980s.)
 

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