1997

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0128.  Monday, 27 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 24 Jan 1997 15:31:50 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.01114  Qs: Theatre of Blood

(2)     From:   Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 24 Jan 1997 21:47:40 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0117  Re: Branagh Interview

(3)     From:   Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 25 Jan 1997 11:12:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0117  Re: Branagh Interview; Midwinter's Tale

(4)     From:   Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 25 Jan 1997 12:52:11 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   MND edition


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 24 Jan 1997 15:31:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.01114  Qs: Theatre of Blood
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.01114  Qs: Theatre of Blood

Try contacting Ken Rothwell at Univ. of Vermont.  He'd probably know.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 24 Jan 1997 21:47:40 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0117  Re: Branagh Interview
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0117  Re: Branagh Interview

There were also two Branagh radio interviews earlier this month.  On NPR
Morning edition January 7 and on Fresh Air January 10.  Transcripts of the
former are available through 202 414 3232 and an audiotape of the latter at 1
800 934-600 (for 15.45).

Also, on McNeil Lehrer January 23 (transcripts and videotapes available) aired
a conversation about the new Shakespeare films with Charlton Heston, David
Kastan, and Micahel Kahn (the Shakespeare Theater director in Washington, DC).

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 25 Jan 1997 11:12:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0117  Re: Branagh Interview; Midwinter's Tale
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0117  Re: Branagh Interview; Midwinter's Tale

Having been away from my computer for a while, I just read a whole batch of
messages and have some brief comments to make on several threads:

It strikes me as strange that no one has yet commented on the fact that,
although Hamlet claims before and after The Mousetrap that its purpose is to
"catch the conscience of the king," during the play itself, his attention seems
to be focused much more closely on Gertrude and her response than on his
uncle's.  My students' papers on this topic taught me a thing or two last
semester.

G.K. Hunter, in his introduction to the Arden edition of *All's Well*, notes
"the words `Monsieur Parolles' written against the title of our play in the
`catalogue' of Charles I's copy of the second folio now preserved in Windsor
Castle" (xlvii).

I am intrigued by Syd Kastan's suggestion that we are to understand that
Cordelia has disguised herself as the Fool, but I have a couple of problems
with that reading that he or others may want to address.  First, both Kent and
Edgar, who clearly disguise themselves, are given speeches in which they
explain this situation to the audience (the opening lines of 1.4 and 2.3
respectively).  If we are to see Cordelia performing a similar act, why is she
not given a similar speech?  Second, what are we to assume that the King of
France feels about his new bride, for whom he stuck his neck out, staying
behind while he goes back home?  Did she not, like Desdemona, marry the man to
live with him?

                                                Michael Friedman
                                                University of Scranton

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 25 Jan 1997 12:52:11 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        MND edition

Perhaps the edition Eric Armstrong mentions is T.O. Treadwell's in the
'Shakespearean Originals' series, general editors Graham Holderness and Bryan
Loughrey. The texts in the series are published by Prentice Hall/Harvester
Wheatsheaf.

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