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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Cordelia and the Fool
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0139.  Tuesday, 28 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Edward Pixley <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 Jan 1997 14:43:50 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0128  Re: Assorted

(2)     From:   Edward Pixley <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 Jan 1997 15:03:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0119  Cordelia and the Fool


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 27 Jan 1997 14:43:50 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0128  Re: Assorted
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0128  Re: Assorted

I, too, am fascinated by the many wonderful insights introduced by Syd Kaston's
thread on Fool/Cordelia equations.  But, like Michael Friedman's reference to
Desdemona's commitment to life with her husband, I wonder what we do with
Cordelia's own I.1 statement, "Sure I shall never marry like my sisters, / To
love my father all."

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <
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Date:           Monday, 27 Jan 1997 15:03:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0119  Cordelia and the Fool
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0119  Cordelia and the Fool

Caveat! Before anyone jumps on me for now recognizing that the last part of the
Cordelia speech I quoted is not in the first folio, we still have her earlier
lines from the same speech:  "Why have my sisters husbands if they say / They
love you all?"  For her to go into the disguise of the Fool following these
lines not only fails to give her the spoken entries to the disguise that we see
in Kent and Edgar, it suggests a deception more akin to what we find in Edmund.
 Though even Edmund revels in the deception of his disguise.  Though the thread
has revealed marvelously evokative Cordelia/Fool parallels, and actual disguise
seems to defy the conventions for disguise that Shakespeare uses elsewhere in
the play.

If I might add to the thread about Edgar's feigning hill climbing, I think it
was in _Shakespeare our Contemporary_ that Jan Kott got such wonderful mileage
out of this being a scene which could work only on that bare platform stage,
because illusionistic scenery would have to show us whether it is a hill or
whether it is a plain, and all the ambiguity is, thus, gone.
 

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