1997

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0140.  Tuesday, 28 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Lisa Hopkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Jan 97 09:57:00 GMT
        Subj:   A Very Drab

(2)     From:   Judy Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Jan 1997 15:22:26 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Re: Sir John Gilbert

(3)     From:   Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Jan 1997 22:29:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Branagh's Ham

(4)     From:   Brad Morris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Jan 1997 18:47:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Iago, Homosexuality and Psychosis


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Jan 97 09:57:00 GMT
Subject:        A Very Drab

You could try Kay Stanton, 'Hamlet's Whores', in _New Essays on Hamlet_, edited
by John Manning and Mark Thornton Burnett (AMS Press, 1994).

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Jan 1997 15:22:26 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Re: Sir John Gilbert

Sir John Gilbert (1817-1897) is listed in the Encyc Brit 11th ed ( the only ref
I have at home), and I'm sure he's in the DNB, Bryan's Dictionary,
Thieme/Becker, and Benezit, all of which should be in a university library.
Hodnett, in *Five Centuries of Book Illustration* (1988) has something on him.
I believe the Folger fairly recently purchased the originals of his
illustrations for Staunton's ed.

Judy Kennedy
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Jan 1997 22:29:44 -0500
Subject:        Re: Branagh's Ham

I was pleased to see that the Duke of Marlborough (the Marlboro man as the
audience members around me joked) got a role in exchange for the use of his
magnificent palace. The credits ripped by SO fast that I could catch WHAT
he played. I am right in thinking that Elsinore and Brideshead Revisited
are one and the same, no?

Eric Armstrong

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brad Morris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Jan 1997 18:47:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Iago, Homosexuality and Psychosis

I have often wondered myself about Iago's sexuality, but being in Oklahoma,
finding someone with which to discuss the issue borders on the impossible. I'm
no Shakespeare scholar, but it seems to me that Iago's sexuality is almost
immaterial. I believe him to be-- plain and simple-- a psychotic, nasty
bastard.

John Mortimer wrote that Iago is not "a nineteenth-century politician scheming
for power." Also, JM states simply, "By behaving as he does, Iago makes the
play work." I would tend to agree.

Rather than being driven by a frustrated homosexual desire for Othello (a case
for which can certainly be made, I can't deny that), I have always thought of
him as, well, the Classic Asshole, if you'll excuse the expression. He's just
plain nuts, and I think Shakespeare was among the first to create such a
character. I wonder if we as 20th-century citizens believe wackos of Iago's
sort didn't exist until recently.

I'm sure many will disagree with me, but that's my opinion. I could be wrong.

Brad Morris

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