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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Re: Dover Cliff; A Very Drab
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0153.  Thursday, 30 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 1997 13:38:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0142  Re: Edgar, Gloucester, and "Dover Cliff"

(2)     From:   Ian Lancashire <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 1997 13:48:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   "drab" again


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 1997 13:38:09 -0500
Subject: 8.0142  Re: Edgar, Gloucester, and "Dover Cliff"
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0142  Re: Edgar, Gloucester, and "Dover Cliff"

Addendum on the "cliff"

If the audience knows the 'ground' is flat and at the same  time that
Gloucester thinks it is steep, surely people unfamiliar with the play are
asking themselves why Edgar is doing this? At that point - or no later than
Gloucester's  grotesque 'fall'-  would not the clash of the two 'realities'
snap an audience into being conscious that it is sitting in the Globe watching
a play? and might that self-reflexive moment  either  detach a viewer
emotionally  or  ( more likely to me) make Gloucester's world subsume  for a
moment the wider globe we all live on. This potential does not exist for a
version made for film or television but it does, I think work in the theatre.

Mary Jane Miller,
Brock University,

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ian Lancashire <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 1997 13:48:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        "drab" again

More on drabs from Renaissance dictionaries: John Palsgrave (English-French),
Sir Thomas Elyot (Latin-English), Thomas Thomas (Latin-English), John Florio
(Italian-English), and Randle Cotgrave (French-English). The reference
citations are to lexicographer, date, and letter number in the total database:
e.g., PL_1530 @ 196203. Each item should be a complete entry.

Ian Lancashire
Toronto

" drab": Palsgrave (PL_1530 @ 196203)

  Drabbe truande, loudiere s fe.

" drab": Palsgrave (PL_1530 @ 196302)

  Drabbe a slutte uilotiere s fe.

" drab": Palsgrave (PL_1530 @ 345980)

  Hore a drabbe putayn s fe.

" drab": Elyot (ET_1538 @ 7455338)

  Spilumenes, a sluttyshe drabbe.

" drab": Elyot (ET_1538 @ 8179783)

  Ambubeiae, dronken drabbes, whiche wander about the stretes.

" drab": Th.Thomas (TT_87 @ 10279659)

  Ambunbaiae, Horat. Dronken drabs that wander about streetes.

" drab": Th.Thomas (TT_87 @ 16890776)

  Scortum, ti, n. g. A harlot, a common strumpet, a drab, a queane. It is
  also taken for puer meritorius: properly it is the hide or skin of a beast.

" drab": Th.Thomas (TT_87 @ 16892241)

  Scraptia, vel Scrapta, ae, f. g. Fest. A worme found in leaues: also a
  stinking drab, a driueling queane.

" drab": Th.Thomas (TT_87 @ 17201719)

  Spilumenes, ae, f. g. * A sluttish drabbe.

" drab": Florio (FL_1598 @ 19916855)

  Draba, an hearbe hauing a tust like elder at the top.

" drab": Florio (FL_1598 @ 21959589)

  Paterina, a queane or a drab.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 27645511)

  Bonnette: f. The bonnet of a sayle. Bonnette traineresse. A drabler; a
  peece added vnto the bonnet, when there is need of more saile.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 32073339)

  Gaultiere: f. A whore, punke, drab, queane, gill, flirt, strumpet,
  cockatrice, made wench, common hackney, good one.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 34505252)

  Paillarde: f. A whore, punke, drab, strumpet, harlot, queane, courtezan,
  callet.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 35021069)

  Pimbesche: f. A willie queane, subtile wench, cunning drab; one that can
  finely execute her Mistresses knauish deuises.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 35583700)

  Putain: f. A whore, queane, punke, drab, flurt, strumpet, harlot,
  cockatrice, naughtie pack, light buswife, common hackney. Effronte en
  putain. As bold, or brasen-faced, as a whore. Putain fait comme la
  corneille, plus se lave & plus noire est elle: Pro. A queane and Crow alike
  doe fare, the more they wash the fouler they are. Assez fait qui fortune
  passe, & plus encor qui putain chasse: Pro. as vnder Fortune. Fils de
  putain ne fit iamais bien: Prov. Neuer did sonne of a whore doe well.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 35586136)

  Putier: m. ere: f. Whorish, drab-like, impudent, immodest, light;
  lasciuious, wenching, whore-hunting.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 35842174)

  Rebut: m. The reffuse, offalls, outcasts, or leauings of better things;
  also, a foyle, repulse, reiecting, putting backe. Brebis de rebut. Drapes,
  Cullings, or Kebbers; old, or diseased sheepe which be not worth keeping.
  Madame de rebut. A loathsome queane, rascallie drab, ouerworne punke,
  pockie whore; {whence}, Les pasles couleurs de Madame de rebut. The Pocks.

" drab": Cotgrave (CT_1611 @ 36298155)

  Rifflarde: f. A rauenous, or a rifling drab; one that loues, or liues by,
  the spoyle of them she conuerses with.
 

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