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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: January ::
Qs: R3 and St. Paul; Scansion
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0161.  Friday, 31 January 1997.

(1)     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jan 1997 16:51 ET
        Subj:   Query: R3 and St. Paul

(2)     From:   Dale Coye <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jan 1997 16:54:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Scansion Query


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Jan 1997 16:51 ET
Subject:        Query: R3 and St. Paul

As he encounters Henry VI's hearse accompanied by Anne, and threatens the guard
with death if they will not set it down, Richard Crookback twice swears by St.
Paul.  He calls on St. Paul 3 more times in the course of the play (1.3.45,
3.4.76, 5.3.16)--the only character in all the canon who invokes Paul. Can
anybody suggest any reasons?  The first scene strikes me as a diabolical parody
of the road to Damascus--Richard encountering a saintly corpse whose wounds
recall Christ's, and receiving not blindness and conversion, but dreadful
insight into the hearts of others, which enables him to spread his bad-spel and
convert followers to worship him.  There might also be a geographical
joke--Anne has just stated that the body is being taken from St. Paul's toward
London Bridge and Chertsey, and a jerk of the thumb would place the scene in
the shadow of the cathedral.  But I wonder if there are any customary
associations with the name of Paul, or any special allegiance of the historical
Richard to this saint, that would account for his invocations.

Dave Evett

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Coye <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Jan 1997 16:54:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Scansion Query

R2 3.3.18 Reads

I know it, uncle, and oppose not myself.

Cercignani, Koekeritz, and the OED2 make no mention of oppose being stressed on
the last syllable or myself on the first.   So how does this scan?  Is there an
anapest in the fourth foot with oppose carrying the two weak stresses?

Also how about RJ 3.2.87

All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers

Was it headless with a broken back? or what?

Dale Coye
The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
Princeton, NJ
 

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