1997

Re: Productions: TN and WT

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0103.  Wednesday, 22 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 14:22:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0090 Re: Productions: 12th Night

(2)     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 18:51:00 +0200
        Subj:   Staging WT


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 14:22:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0090 Re: Productions: 12th Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0090 Re: Productions: 12th Night

In the Arroyo Grande Eagle Theatre production of Twelfth Night last spring, we
put the intermission between III,1 and III,2 right after Olivia has been
chasing Viola/Cesario around the stage.

This gave the audience something to talk about during intermission, and is
tantilizing enough to make them want to see the second half. Our audiences tend
to be young and or uncultured, so they very seldom know how the story ends
coming in. For this reason, I like to put intermission at some point where the
other shoe is about to drop, but it's still hanging there.

The beginning of III, 2 is also almost exactly the halfway point in the text.

The reason we have intermission in 20th century theatres are so people can
smoke, pee, and to sell concessions.

For some reason people are able to sit in church for 2 hours, they'll watch a
baseball game for 2 hours, they are able to sit in movie theaters for 2 hours,
and at home they'll sit in front of the tv channel surfing for up to 6 hours
without a break, but if you try to do a play without an official intermission,
they cry havoc.

Why is this?

Best wishes,
Billy Houck
Arroyo Grande Eagle Theatre

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 18:51:00 +0200
Subject:        Staging WT

I am very enthusiastic about Mark Mann's staging of intervals of WT and TN
alike.  Very inventive theater.  The WT screens not only pleased me but
reminded me as well that after the production closed in which I made my Shak.
debut as the Bear (1965), the director, Sandy Havens, confided in me that he
had wanted to signal the changing of scenes in our production by a stage hand
coming out and turning another gigantic page of a mock-up of a book, the actors
entering through the spine of the book, so to speak.  I have always regretted
that we did not frame the action in that way, bringing "an old tale" on the
stage through a tome. The prod. had other merits, but  I still pine for what
did not happen.  It was, of course, my first Shakespeare but I remember it well
for other things than that.  Good for Mark Mann with the screens and the
interval.  Wish I had been in Columbus to see it.

John Velz
Austin, TX

Re: Current thoughts on MND

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0102.  Wednesday, 22 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 13:42:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0098 Qs: Current thoughts on MND

(2)     From:   Clark Bowlen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 16:08:25 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0098  Qs: Current thoughts on MND


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 13:42:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0098 Qs: Current thoughts on MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0098 Qs: Current thoughts on MND

Hi. This isn't a theme, but it's a cute story.

When I cast A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM last summer, the boy who had been cast as
Snug came up to me and whispered:

        "Aw, Mr. Houck, you know I can't memorize no lines."

        I responded: "That's perfect! do it just like that!"

He wandered away, not quite sure what was going on...

Billy Houck
Arroyo Grande Eagle Theatre

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clark Bowlen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 16:08:25 -0500
Subject: 8.0098  Qs: Current thoughts on MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0098  Qs: Current thoughts on MND

If the Athens/Wood dichotomy is the spine of the play, I think it plays more
powerfully reversed, _i.e._ in the 20th century, we live in the woods and fear
the denizens of Athens. Several years ago we did such an urban, rap version of
MND that successfully got at the play's dark side. (Our Athens was a landscaped
country club exterior. We boarded it up with graffiti-smeared plywood, changed
the park bench to a bus stop, and replaced the topiaries with trash piles to
effect the transformation, but ....)

Re: Strange Brew

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0100.  Wednesday, 22 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tues, 21 Jan 1997 09:20:21 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0089  Re: Strange Brew

(2)     From:   Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 14:18
        Subj:   Strange Brew; Non-Shakespearean Videos


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Armstrong <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tues, 21 Jan 1997 09:20:21 -0500
Subject: 8.0089  Re: Strange Brew
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0089  Re: Strange Brew

>_Strange Brew_ is the story of beer-loving Doug and Bob Mackensie (characters
>from the Second City TV series) who are supposed to be parallel to Rosencrantz
>and Guildenstern. They go to visit a friend whose father has died and whose
>uncle has seized the family kingdom, a brewery. (Here in the college town of
>Athens, GA. everyone who has heard of this film says it's a cult classic for
>beer-drinking undergraduates, and I get blank looks if I mention _Hamlet_.)
>
>Fran Teague

This is what my fiancee told me (her family are Strange Brew fanatics)
Some details:
-The beer brand is called Elsinore beer.
- Their friend, Pam (Hamlet), is upset because her uncle is trying to write her
out of her inheritance of the brewery/insane asylum. She must wait til she is
21, despite the fact that the actress looks 31...
- Pam is in love with Rosie, (a man) an ex-NHL star who has been placed in the
insane asylum.
- The ghost of her father comes back to reveal the truth regarding his death,
through a faulty wiring system in a video game, which replays footage of the
actual killing (involving the electric fence).

In all seriousness,

eric.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 14:18
Subject:        Strange Brew; Non-Shakespearean Videos

Yes Fran,

That is an accurate description of Strange Brew.  The plot from the IMDB:
Something is rotten at the Elsinore Brewery. Bob and Doug Mackenzie (as seen on
SCTV) help the orphan Pam regain the brewery founded by her recently-deceased
father. But to do so, they must confront the suspicious brewmaster and two
teams of vicious hockey players.

The Mackenzie brothers also have their own page with more than you'd ever want
to know about the movie at:
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/ernestc/mackbros.htm

Good luck trying to explain Shakespeare at UGA.

Jimmy Jung
Georgia Tech, class of 84
"go jackets"

Re: Ideology

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0101.  Wednesday, 22 January 1997.

(1)     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 18:14:30 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: Teaching British to the Englanders

(2)     From:   Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 10:53:25 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0096  Re: Ideology and Soliloquys


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 18:14:30 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Re: Teaching British to the Englanders

John Lee writes

> It's a small point, but I would think that few who have passed
> through the English Educational System would recognize it from
> Gabriel Egan's description.

I hope I made it clear that I was referring to the British system, and not
whatever the 'English' system is. (English is taught as a subject in Britain,
but not, even mutatis mutandis, vice versa).

> And Rhodes Boyson isn't Minister for Education.  Gillian Shepherd is.

Again, I'd hoped to make it clear (by using the words 'the 1980s') that Boyson
was the minister, and not that he is.

Gabriel Egan

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 10:53:25 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 8.0096  Re: Ideology and Soliloquys
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0096  Re: Ideology and Soliloquys

>"The postulate itself, however, cannot be proven; it is merely a prejudice,"
>writes Sean Lawrence--I think--correctly.  Meaning is postulated, not proven.
>So I believe; I don't really know.
>
>Dale Lyle is apparently fed up with my insistence that entities and actions are
>not innately meaningful.  So let me make my point:  it seems to me that the
>Marxist Shakespeareans first postulate that there is no innate meaning, no
>inherent truth. They then go on to postulate that certain categories (e.g.,
>economics, ideology) have innate meanings and are inherently true.
>
>I don't think anyone can have it both ways.  If entities and actions are not
>innately meaningful, then they are not innately meaningful. Full stop.

And, if it is postulated that there is no innate meaning, does that apply to
the statement that there is no innate meaning, thereby rendering it
meaningless, and leading to the conclusion that there is or might be innate
meaning, that to deny it is self-contradictory, and therefore untenable?

    Roger Schmeeckle

New York Times Reviews and Feature Articles

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 8.0099.  Tuesday, 21 January 1997.

From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jan 1997 02:07:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        New York Times Reviews and Feature Articles

SHAKSPERians who would like to see what the "Newspaper of Record" has to say
about recent New York, or London, productions should add the following URL to
their "Bookmarks" :

http//www.nytimes.com/

Many New York Times reviews and feature articles get posted here.

For a shortcut to the theater news and reviews try:

http://www.nytimes.com/library/theater/

Happy Web surfing,
Tom Dale Keever
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.