1997

Re: Poet in JC; St. Crispin's Day; Michaelmas

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0395.  Monday, 31 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 97 15:14:29 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0391  Qs: Poet in JC

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 21:41:35 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0382  St. Crispin's Day

[3]     From:   Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 22:44:00 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0382 Re: St. Crispin's Day


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 97 15:14:29 EST
Subject: 8.0391  Qs: Poet in JC
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0391  Qs: Poet in JC

David Frankel asks for a "larger reason" for the episode of the poet in
_JC_ who breaks into Brutus' and Cassius' quarrel.  I can suggest one.
In fact, when I was teaching Sx long ago, I used to use this as a "way
in" to the play.

I read JC as about a schism between Brutus and Cassius along the lines
of idealist/realist, spirit/body.  The two aspects are joined in Caesar
and foolishly torn apart by the conspirators.  "In the spirit of men
there is no blood; / O that then we could come by Caesar's spirit, / And
not dismember Caesar," is Brutus' idealistic wish.

The cynic-poet episode should be read against the Cinna the Poet
episode.  (Both, Sx kept from Plutarch.)  The plebeians demonstrate the
same folly as Brutus-Cassius when they capture Cinna: "Pluck but his
name out of his heart and turn him going."  The cynic-poet comes to the
generals' tent to put the two men and the body-spirit split they
represent back together.  He combines an appeal to "love," some-laughs
at him, but Brutus indignantly chases him off.  Both reject anything
that would re-create the unity of body and spirit.  Perhaps Sx is saying
that that's what poetry does: a physical medium with a spiritual
significance.  The kind of splitting Brutus & Cassius create destroys
not only Caesar and themselves, but poetry.

I suspect, though, that this may be a critic's ingenuity.  In any case I
think the second episode would strike an audience as out of place,
particularly since Brutus and Cassius have already made up their
quarrel.

--Best, Norm Holland

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 21:41:35 GMT
Subject: 8.0382  St. Crispin's Day
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0382  St. Crispin's Day

Steve Sohmer writes

> Thomas Platter's memoir cites a performance of
> [Shakespeare's] JC on 21 September [1599]

Andrew Gurr concurs

> Thomas Platter saw it [Shakespeare's JC] on 21
> September [1599].

Platter wrote: "in the straw-thatched house we saw the tragedy of the
first Emperor Julius Caesar" (Schanzer's translation). This might be
Shakespeare's play, but then again it might not.

Gabriel Egan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 22:44:00 -0800
Subject: 8.0382 Re: St. Crispin's Day
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0382 Re: St. Crispin's Day

Regarding St. Crispin and kin, Gary Taylor's Oxford _H5_ says the days
figure on Elizabethan and Jacobean almanacs, but simply having a feast
day on the calendar is no sign of status among saints. After all,
_every_ day is the feast day of one saint or another, and most days of
more than one. If these two ever were of any importance to the French,
there remains no evidence; they're not mentioned in standard lists
today, and their only namesake seems to be  the unscrupulous and
impudent hero of Lesage's 1707 "Crispin rival de son maitre."
Shakespeare mentions neither anywhere but in Henry's speech.

John King's mention of "a place called Soissons," though, rings loud
Gallic bells. Two things every French schoolboy knows about Clovis are
that he was the first king of all the Franks and that he broke a
(possibly legendary) vase at Soissons, a city in the northeast, now
about half way between Paris and the Belgian border. Clovis's name is
forever linked in French minds to the start of French glory as well as
to Soissons. If Shakespeare had any such connection in mind, though, he
would most likely have named Clovis or Soissons, both much more widely
known, then as now, than the obscure Crispin & Co.

Fluellen's lines that Naomi Liebler cites about mending shoes are echoed
in the cobblers' lines that open "Caesar," providing another small link
between the plays she convincingly pairs up politically and religiously.

Now, where can I find more of Steve Sohmer's discoveries of the
connections between Shakespeare's plays and the English obstinacy in
holding to the outdated Julian calendar?

All the best,
Skip Nicholson

Workshop: Thinking And Doing

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0394.  Monday, 31 March 1997.

From:           Julie Bleha <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 10:57:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Thinking And Doing

                Columbia University
                THINKING AND DOING:
                Performance and Text
                  May 2-4, 1997

In three days of workshops, panel discussions, and performances, this
conference will bring together theatre theorists and practitioners to
explore the position of text in theatrical production.  The conference
will take place within the theatres on Columbia campus and is set to
coincide with Anne Bogart's production of AMERICAN SILENTS.

Panelists include:

Robert Auletta, Arnold Aronson, Susan Bennett, Anne Bogart, Una
Chaudhuri, Helene Foley, David Greenspan, Anne Hamburger, David Henry
Hwang, Margo Jefferson, Bill T. Jones, Richard Knowles, Shelby Jiggetts,
James Leverett, Kristin Linklater, Emily Mann, Oliver Mayer, Martin
Meisel, Charles L. Mee, Joseph Roach, Andrei Serban, Priscilla Smith,
Kendall Thomas, Froma Zeitlin.

With performances by Elevator Repair Service and Premium Bob.

For more information, contact Heidi Coleman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or,
beginning April 1st, visit our website at:
www.columbia.edu/cu/arts/conference

Technical Problem

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0392.  Friday, 31 March 1997.

From:           Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, March 31, 1997
Subject:        Technical Problem

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

On Friday, the Sun work station that runs SHAKSPER shut down.  I was
just able to get the machine repaired, but I do not think that I will be
able to get to the accumulated mail until tomorrow.

Hardy

RE: Shakespeare in Modern Music

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0393.  Monday, 31 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Matthew Hansen
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 13:04:41 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   RE: Shakespeare in Modern Music

[2]     From:   Wes Folkerth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 09:00:50 -0500
        Subj:   Mod Music Shakespeare

[3]     From:   David Lindley" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 16:02:34 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0389  Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music

[4]     From:   Mark Mann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 12:27:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0388 Qs: Sh. Mod. Music

[5]     From:   K. Graham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 10:55:39 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0389  Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music

[6]     From:   Charles Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 16:29:21 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0389 Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music

[7]     From:   Sam Schimek <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 16:26:14 -0700
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Modern Music

[8]     From:   Shaul Bassi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 Mar 1997 15:40:32 +0200 (METDST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0388  Qs: Sh. Mod. Music


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Hansen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 13:04:41 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        RE: Shakespeare in Modern Music

For Georgianna Ziegler,

It is with extreme caution that I submit my first public posting to
SHAKSPER.  I shall return to my silent post behind the arras hopefully
before the knives are out.

I do, however, have a few additions to Georgianna's catalogue of modern
musical Shakespeare allusions.

XTC have a song on their album Nonsuch (which is noticeably
Shakespearean and Elizabethan in its physical design) entitled "My Bird
Performs" the song contains the line "Shakespeare's sonnets leave me
cold/  The Drama, Stage, and the high-brow prose."

The Smiths have a song called "Shakespeare's Sister" and of course there
was also later a band of the same name.

There was a (now alas defunct) Minneapolis-based band that called
themselves Trip Shakespeare.  My memory is not recalling immediate song
allusions though they are certainly there.  They do have one song
entitled "Pearl" which the lyrics reveal to be very allusive to the poem
of the same name. I am still trying to work out whether I love that band
because of its name (and very intelligent music) or if I decided to
specialise in Early Modern Studies because I love that band.  In all
likelihood the two elements are mutually exclusive.  And more
information than you cared to know.

I also have a CD somewhere from a band that called themselves the
Merchants of Venus.

Related, but indirectly:

Deep Blue Something (recent top ten single equaled "Breakfast at
Tiffany's") have a track entitled "Gammer Gurten's Needle".  I'm not
sure if the mis-spelling is theirs or if it originates in the catalogue
advertising their album that I read a few days ago.

Yours,
Matt

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Wes Folkerth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 09:00:50 -0500
Subject:        Mod Music Shakespeare

Here's another one,

Back in the late 60s when Fleetwood Mac was still a blues band, Peter
Green titled their first album "Then Play On," a slight paraphrase from
TN.  Shakespeare leaves the "then" out of the if...then construction,
"If music be the food of love, play on."

Wes Folkerth
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 16:02:34 GMT
Subject: 8.0389  Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0389  Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music

I wonder if the fact that Romeo and Juliet turn up in a song by Dire
Straits has anything to do with the fact that Mark Knopfler is a
graduate in English from Leeds University?

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Mann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 12:27:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0388 Qs: Sh. Mod. Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0388 Qs: Sh. Mod. Music

<< Do any of you out there know places in modern music where Shakespeare
is mentioned?   >>

As I recall, Sting's album The Dream of the Blue Turtles, contains a
song with Shakespearean references, though I'm damned if I can remember
what it is. It is mentioned in the liner notes, though.....cheers, Mark
Mann

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           K. Graham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 10:55:39 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 8.0389  Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0389  Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music

Harry Chapin's "There Only Was One Choice" (reference to Hamlet) hasn't
been mentioned yet.  Also, didn't The Band have a song that mentioned
Ophelia?

Ken Graham
New Mexico State University

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Ross <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 16:29:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0389 Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0389 Re: Shakespeare and Modern Music

Re Georgina Ziegler's pop music request: Does anyone remember Donovan
from the 60s? He recorded "Under the Greenwood Tree" on one of his
albums.

Charlie Ross
Purdue

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Schimek <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 16:26:14 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare and Modern Music

The following is has been put together by the Elvis Costello list who
always like to help. Many thanks are due to these fine people. I did not
include references to historical personages unless it was clear that the
reference was based on the play. (Cleopatra, Henry VIII (Saving us a
reference to Herman's Hermits)) Lyrics are included when the reference
is not obvious and the original poster included them. Let me know if you
need more, this thread is pretty  active. My only comment is that I can
guess what a lot of people had to read in high school.

Adamson, Barry
        Something Wicked This Way Comes
Alvin, Dave
        Romeo's Escape.
Beatles, The
        I am the Walrus
Big Audio Dynamite
        Over The Rise
Bon Jovi
        Romeo is Bleeding
Cherry, Neneh
        Buddy X
Costello, Elvis
        Crimes of Paris
        Juliet Letters, The (album)
        Just A Memory - "...better take another measure for measure"
        Miss Macbeth
        Mystery Dance
        Terror and Magnificence
Counting Crows
        Miller's Angels
Dire Straits
        Romeo & Juliet
Dixon, Don
        Romeo at Julliard (album)
        Romeo
Dylan, Bob
        Desolation Row - "Now Ophelia, she's 'neath the window
                          For her I feel so afraid
                          On her twenty-second birthday
                          She already is an old maid"
        Highway 61 Revisited - "Now the fifth daughter on the TWELFTH
NIGHT
        Stuck inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again
                                "Shakespeare, he's in the alley.."
Forbert, Steve
        Romeo's Tune
Hagar, Sammy
        Rock 'n' Roll Romeo
Indigo Girls
        Romeo & Juliet (cover of Dire Straits version)
        Touch Me Fall
Morrissey
        King Leer
Parton, Dolly
        Romeo
Penn, Michael
        No Myth -  "What if I was Romeo in black jeans ..."
Reed, Lou
        Romeo Had Juliette
The Smiths
        Shakespeare's Sister
Sting
        Nothing Like the Sun (Album)
        Consider Me Gone
Waits, Tom
        Romeo is Bleeding
Wasserman, Rob
        Put Your Big Toe in the Milk of Human Kindness (w/Elvis
Costello)
XTC
        My Bird Performs - "Shakespeare's sonnets leave me cold
                            The drama stage, the high brow prose"
        Omnibus - "Ain't nothing in the world like a black skinned girl
                  Make your Shakespeare hard and make your oyster pearl"

[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Shaul Bassi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 Mar 1997 15:40:32 +0200 (METDST)
Subject: 8.0388  Qs: Sh. Mod. Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0388  Qs: Sh. Mod. Music

Laurie Anderson has a beautiful song, "Blue Lagoon" (in *Mr.
Heartbreak*) in which she sings "Full fathom five".
An anecdote from Italy: Ron, winner of the 1996 San Remo Festival (the
most important and tacky musical contest in the country) with "Vorrei
incontrarti tra cent'anni" (I wish I could meet you in a hundred years)
was accused of having plagiarized one of Shakespeare's sonnets, and
risked losing the award because the song was not "original"... all
singers are warned!

Shaul Bassi
(Venezia, Italy)

Qs: Poet in JC; Hamlet's Misogyny: Lr. Video

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0391.  Thursday, 27 March 1997.

[1]     From:   C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 17:10:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The Poet in Julius Caesar

[2]     From:   Don R. Hamersley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 18:06:08 -0800
        Subj:   Non-Freudian Reasons for Hamlet

[3]     From:   Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 20:43:11 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Lear Video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 17:10:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Poet in Julius Caesar

In Act IV, scene iii of JC, while Brutus and Cassius are arguing in the
tent, a character identified as POET in my text (and I assume the Folio)
enters, makes an attempt to stop the argument, and is shooed away by
both Cassius and Brutus (hence achieving, though not quite in the way he
intended, his goal).

I have two questions:  1) since the character is not called a poet in
the text (except, possibly, for Cassius's caustic comment "How vilely
doth this cynic rhyme"), would the Elizabethan audience have known he
was a poet-was there, for example, a conventional costume?

2) Is there any larger reason, do you think, for this little snippet's
existence beyond the practical need to have *something* serve as a
stimulus for Cassius and Brutus to end their argument?

Thanks.
cdf

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don R. Hamersley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 18:06:08 -0800
Subject:        Non-Freudian Reasons for Hamlet

I have just done a short paper on Laurence Olivier's 1948 "Hamlet" and
the Freudian/Oedipal approach to interpreting the play.  Without opening
a huge can of worms on the topic (if that is possible with "Hamlet"), I
am in search of some more non-Freudian explanations of Hamlet's apparent
misogyny.

Perhaps a large source of it is Hamlet's frustration over his inability
to share with the 2 women in his life, Gertrude and Ophelia, his
suspicions of Claudius both before the arrival of the ghost ("O my
prophetic soul!" (1.5))  and after.  In contrast, Hamlet seems to have
no problem identifying with Horatio (1.2.161: "Horatio-or I do forget
myself") and confiding in him, but he cannot say a word to either
Ophelia or Gertrude.  This does NOT mean that he easily trusts all men
either, as we see him drive Marcellus to distraction with his demands
for an oath (Mar: "but my lord we have sworn already!")

Indeed, from the point of view that I suggest above, it seems to make
more sense that the turning point in Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia
occurs right AFTER he appears to her all disheveled after the ghost's
visit.  Maybe he went to her to confide in her and then determined that
he could not (thinking that she might give his secret away-"Frailty, thy
name is woman").  Certainly, their relationship goes straight downhill
from this point forward...

Seen from this view-i.e., that Hamlet is disappointed only in the 2
particular women nearest to him-perhaps Hamlet is not a misogynist at
all.  He seems to talk to Rosen. & Guild. about women like an excited
schoolboy (2.2.225 and "man delights not me" soon after) upon their
arrival.  And he is not shy or disgusted about sexual and "country"
matters talking to Ophelia in 3.2.  So maybe he is just upset with the 2
women in his life who have let him down.  And besides, others in the
play use phrases like "Frailty, thy name is woman," as does Claudius in
1.2 telling Hamlet in front of all the courtiers that he is acting like
a woman ('tis unmanly grief).

Any thoughts on this, smaller than a thesis or a byte-sized breadbox,
would be appreciated...

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 20:43:11 -0800
Subject:        Re: Lear Video

Does anyone know if a video exists of the old (mid-70s?) TV production
of King Lear with James Earl Jones? I think Joseph Papp did it, and I
want to say that Raul Julia played "one of the 'E' guys."

Much obliged for any leads...

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