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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: MND; Tmp
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0313.  Tuesday, 4 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Dale Lyles <
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        Date:   Monday, 3 Mar 1997 14:58:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: MND

[2]     From:   Julie Blumenthal <
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        Date:   Monday, 03 Mar 1997 16:03:54 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0308 Re: MND; Tmp


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
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Date:           Monday, 3 Mar 1997 14:58:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: MND

I understand your distinction and irony between "allowed," etc.

However, if you switch Oberon and Titania, then Oberon has no more
opportunity to allow or disallow any topping than Titania does in a
regular production.  I'm having difficulty seeing how an instantly
smitten Oberon could be said to "allow" anything.  After all, that's the
whole point, isn't it?  The victim of the juice has no choice.  So back
to my original question: in what ways would a smitten Oberon be
different from the usual Titania?

And (this just occurred to me) it is not Hermia and Helena who have the
juice applied to them.  It is the men.  Of course, they awake to bandy
about the affections of the women, don't they?  It's all too hard a knot
for me to untie, so far.

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julie Blumenthal <
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Date:           Monday, 03 Mar 1997 16:03:54 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0308 Re: MND; Tmp.
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0308 Re: MND; Tmp.

> Hermione's fidelity in *Winter's Tale*, Perdita and Marina's chasteness
> - in the latter case almost a palpable force - all connect with the

I must step in here and attempt to differentiate between virginity and
complete lack of sexualization.  To my mind, _all_ of the aforementioned
ladies show a marvelous sense of sexuality as a character trait; witness
Hermione in I ii or Perdita's flower speech in IV iv, as well as some of
Miranda's lines.  In this I find a major difference from Marina!
Notably, I think, because Marina's major role is as a restorer of the
past, vs. a way into the future (Mir. and Per.).  In fact, most of the
proof of their virginity comes as a show of their honor in not
succumbing to their 'earthly desires.'  There's a difference between not
doing it and not wanting to!

Vis a vis Ariel - - the extremely popular RSC MND of a few seasons back
had a male and fairly melancholic Puck whose depression quite obviously
stemmed from his love (physical and otherwise) for Oberon, and his
jealousy over Ob.'s infatuation with 'the Indian boy.'  To me, it was a
highly effective choice which gave Puck a heck of a lot more depth than
anything I'd seen before.  I imagine a similar male Ariel-Prospero
reading could be interesting.

Julie Blumenthal
 

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