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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Desdemona's Guilt; Lover/Lass; Facsimiles; WT
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0344.  Tuesday, 11 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Richard A Burt <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Mar 1997 15:45:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0334  Re: Desdemona's Guilt

[2]     From:   David Jackson <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Mar 1997 18:19:37 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0325  RE: A Lover and his Lass

[3]     From:   Steve Urkowitz <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Mar 97 18:54:59
        Subj:      Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 4 Mar 1997 to 5 Mar 1997

[4]     From:   Joseph "Chepe" Lockett <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Mar 1997 16:54:53 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0337  TWT in Houston, TX


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Mar 1997 15:45:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0334  Re: Desdemona's Guilt
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0334  Re: Desdemona's Guilt

On Desdemona, check out Stephen Greenblatt's chapter on _Othello_ in
_Renasisance Self-Fashioning_.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Jackson <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Mar 1997 18:19:37 -0500
Subject: 8.0325  RE: A Lover and his Lass
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0325  RE: A Lover and his Lass

I accidentally erased some of my recent e-mails before reading them; Is
someone looking for a setting of "It Was a Lover and His Lass"? The
Finzi version is available on the Chandos label's "If There Were Dreams
to Sell", which in addition to having the five Finzi settings of
Shakespeare songs, also has three Shakespeare songs set by Roger
Quilter. Stephen Varcoe is the singer, with Richard Hickox conducting
the City of London Sinfonia. The catalogue number is CHAN 8748, and I
don't know if it's still in print, but it's a great CD.

Incidentally,  I also wrote a setting for "IWALAHL" and the other AYLI
songs (plus a complete underscore for the Wedding scene/Hymenfest) for a
production I directed several years ago; I would be glad to make a tape
for interested parties (I think I also have it in MIDI format).

David Jackson

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Mar 97 18:54:59 EST
Subject:        Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 4 Mar 1997 to 5 Mar 1997

Facsimiles . . .

Whoa! . . . Slow down a little about idealizations and texts and the
veil of print and all the implications of the differences between the
Hinman Facisimile and a "real" mixed one assembled and bound in some
grotty bookshop in Early Modern London.

We're really talking about books, I think, as tools, as objects with
writing that we then use for other things.  Like reading.  Or like
governing or at least suggesting stage presentations, or (as they were
originally intended, don't ya' know) as filmscripts.

The value of having facsimiles is so that we can see what the editors
have been working on.  We can see their brilliant successes, and we can
see their egregiously ignoramic blunders.  It takes immense linguistic
and imaginative inventiveness for readers and actors and directors to
make a script come alive.  That is true whether they're inspiring a
modern edition or a photofacsimile.  The modern editors'
regularizations, stage directions, or notes sometimes help
wonderfully.   Sometimes they ring flat and dull.  Same with the
earliest versions.  But having the alternatives encour ages us to think
"differentially."

If one text gives a speech as "My Lord." and another version reads "My
Lord?" then we theatre loonies can jump alert, thinking, "That's
something I want my actor to try out."  Students LIKE stuff like that.
It helps them to translate written code into speech act.

The grim-jawed economy of scarcity that refuses so steadfastly to grant
the pleasures of textual diversity seems to carry the day.  That's sad,
given the dancing possibilities.  Look at the Werstine-Mowat
introductions to the New Folgers, for example.  Happy multiplicities get
sneered at and stigmatized if they happen to occur in the arenas of
multiple texts.

We can't reproduce 1623 experience.  But we can watch the dancing
possibilities as we compare 1603, 1605, 1623, and 1997 reprintings of
the moments before Ophelia enters mad.  Each different, each play-ful.
Why the heck not?  Line 'em up on a page in the appendix.

The why not, I fear, touches on imaginative parsimony within the
contexts of immense scholarly generosity.  Ho hum, I will go sing.

        ever,
       Steve never-quite-the-original-but-not-a-bad-quarto Urkowitz

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph "Chepe" Lockett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 10 Mar 1997 16:54:53 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.0337  TWT in Houston, TX
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0337  TWT in Houston, TX

Best wishes to Jay T. Louden on his production of THE WINTER'S TALE at
UC Irvine (and to the other by A Noise Within).

California is a bit far off for me, but I'd like to invite any Southern
Shakespeareans to Rice University's Houston, TX production of THE
WINTER'S TALE, the twenty-seventh year of Baker Shakespeare Theatre.  We
run Thu-Sun Mar 13-16 and Wed-Sat Mar 19-22.  Box office is 527-4040.

For further information, our web site (and budding historical archive)
is:

        http://www.rice.edu/BakerShakespeare

I, too, would welcome any ensuing feedback.  I'm quite pleased with the
comic turn we've given the first half of V.ii, among others.
 

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