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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Herbs; Gaffes; Burton Hamlet; WH
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0358.  Friday, 14 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Louis Marder <
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        Date:   Sunday, 2 Mar 1997 00:50:07 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0339  Qs: Herbs

[2]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Mar 1997 16:52:14 +0200
        Subj:   Gaffes on Stage

[3]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Mar 1997 18:49:02 -0400
        Subj:   "Lost" Burton _Hamlet_

[4]     From:   Neil Hunt <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Mar 1997 07:14:30 +0000
        Subj:   WH - could he be William Hole (engraver)?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
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Date:           Sunday, 2 Mar 1997 00:50:07 PST
Subject: 8.0339  Qs: Herbs
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0339  Qs: Herbs

Rhonda:  Dogberry is the fruit of either the Cornus sanguinea or of the
Euonymus Europaeus.  Cornus is preferred.  They call it  " Dogge berry
tree because the berries are not fit to be eaten, or to be given to a
dogge."  Another source calls Dogberry (dogwood) the Thelycrania
sanguinea.  It is a decoction of Dogwood formerly used to wash mangy
dogs, hence the name. From Louis Marder, Shakespeare Data Bank,

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Mar 1997 16:52:14 +0200
Subject:        Gaffes on Stage

My wife played Mariana in a campus production of *Measure for Measure*
in 1970.  At the point in Act IV where Isabella is describing to Mariana
how to take her place in Angelo's gardenhouse she begins "There is a
garden circummur'd with brick". One night during performance Isabella's
clear voice carried to every ear in the audience:  "There is a garden
circumcised with brick".  The two women got through the rest of the
scene somehow but as they hit the wings holding hands, Isabella was
muttering through clenched teeth:  "Circumcised; circumcised - Oh
GOD!".  I told the story to many a class over the years as I had in my
course description a firm promise to tell one good theater anecdote
about every play we read.  One year a student interrupted the laughter
(women always laughed much more than men at this one) that followed the
anecdote with an impulsive shout.  "What kills is the two words 'with
brick'".  More laughter from the class, not much of it from men.

Cheers,
John Velz

P.S. as you can see from my course description, I have a rich trove of
anecdotes but not too many are gaffes of this kind.  I intended most of
them to be instructive.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Mar 1997 18:49:02 -0400
Subject:        "Lost" Burton _Hamlet_

This has been discussed recently, so I don't think it was all that
"lost," but I thought this might be of interest. I remember seeing the
original at a little movie house in Morehead, Ky.

Burton's 'Hamlet' To 'Premiere' On Internet

LOS ANGELES (Reuter) - A long-lost film of Richard Burton's 1964
Tony-winning Broadway performance of "Hamlet" has been found by the
actor's widow, and a restored version will be premiered on the Internet
next month.

The ground-breaking 'first' for the world-wide computer network will be
available on the Alternative Entertainment Network site from April 6-10,
using video streaming technology.

"I am thrilled that students and lovers of Shakespeare will have the
opportunity to see this memorable performance on the Internet," Burton's
widow Sally said from her home in England.

She told AEN she found the film in some rusting cans at the couple's
home in Switzerland.

It was the only remaining print of the three-hour film made in 1964
before an audience at a Broadway theater. The film was shown in movie
houses for only two days before Burton ordered all prints destroyed,
because he believed Hamlet should best be experienced on stage.

The Welsh actor had kept the original print for himself at his Swiss
chalet in Celigny.

Now the digitally-restored film will be available on-line, but viewers
have to log on in advance to make a reservation. The site
(http://www.aentv.com/home/chspecial.htm) has preview clips of the film
and an interview with Burton, who died in August 1984.

Since last May, when it was launched with the webcast of the movie
"Casino," AEN has grown to offer 11 channels of interactive video
programming.

Reuters/Variety

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Neil Hunt <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Mar 1997 07:14:30 +0000
Subject:        WH - could he be William Hole (engraver)?

Identity of  WH

Over a number of years I have been conducting research into the
possibility that the Sonnets  <Mr.WH> is the engraver William Hole. A
connection being that he engraved works for, and a portrait of, the
favoured  <rival poet> George Chapman; whose first translation of Homer
appeared in 1598. A date I set for the composition of Sonnet 86.

At this time it is interesting to note that the Earl of Southampton was
pretty much occupied. He was at sea with Essex 1596-7; he married
Elizabeth Vernon in  1598, incurring the wrath of Elizabeth who had him
imprisoned for a short while. On his release he served with Essex in
Ireland.

I am interested to learn whether anyone else has any evidence that may
identify William Hole as WH, or refute this theory.

Neil Hunt (on behalf of Ronald Arthur Hunt)
11 Letchworth Avenue, Chatham, Kent ME4 6NP, UK
tel: (0)1634 846848

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