Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Ideology; Polonius; R3; Gaffes
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0361.  Sunday, 17 March 1997.

[1]     From:   David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 14 Mar 1997 13:21 ET
        Subj:   SHK 8.0353  Re: Ideology

[2]     From:   David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 14 Mar 1997 14:14 ET
        Subj:   SHK 8.0355  Re: Polonius

[3]     From:   Hilary D. Thimmesh <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 14 Mar 1997 10:20:17 -0600
        Subj:   Richard III's Soul

[4]     From:   Kirby C Farrell <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Mar 1997 11:21:50
        Subj:   Re: Trouble onstage


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 14 Mar 1997 13:21 ET
Subject: Re: Ideology
Comment:        SHK 8.0353  Re: Ideology

Terence Hawkes' suggestion that T. S. Eliot wanted to "reconstruct" St.
Louis "on the banks of the Thames" must fall oddly on the ears of most
Americans, whose image of that city owes far more to the demotic, not to
say anarchic energies of Mark Twain, Thomas Hart Benton, and Dizzy Dean
than to a man who never once, as far as I can recall, honored the Middle
Western elements in his upbringing.  Which doesn't weaken H's argument
about the ideogical basis of Eliot's judgment on _Hamlet_; it does
indeed seem to be just that fascination with the demotic and the
anarchic, given such large scope in the play, that curdled Eliot's
appreciation - and which this Middle Westerner particular loves in it.

David Evett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 14 Mar 1997 14:14 ET
Subject: Re: Polonius
Comment:        SHK 8.0355  Re: Polonius

The Stratford (Ont) _Hamlet_ of 1975 was all about repression. Costumes
were based on C17 northern European portraits - Rembrandt, et al. -
black coats, small high ruffs, smallish hats; Ophelia, mad, came on in a
strait-jacket (according to something I remember reading at the time,
based on historical information) that in effect crucified its wearer,
fastened by the wrists and arms to a wooden cross piece through the
sleeves.  Beneath and around these Calvinistic or
Counter-Reformation-Catholic rigidities, furtive passions.  The Polonius
(I've forgotten his name and the program is at home) set the tone for
all this. He presided over the opening courtroom scene as Foreign
Secretary, from a stand-up desk at center right, treated with evident
respect by Claudius and Gertrude, grave, a little testy, but with an
unruly, lubricious imagination.  The loquacity and rhetorical
extravagance seemed to bespeak an unwillingness to relinquish control,
to give up the floor, and both Laertes and Ophelia came across as
submissive, persuaded that Father really did know best, but galled,
also, by the restraint.  It made sense to me.  Has anybody on the list
looked at the promptbook and noted the cuts? -- I'm thinking that the
production eliminated some of the lines that can make him seem a fool.

David Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hilary D. Thimmesh <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 14 Mar 1997 10:20:17 -0600
Subject:        Richard III's Soul

Shakespeare apparently thought Richard III had a soul.  See
V,3,119-220.  Repetition of the word sinks home until Richard
acknowledges "shadows tonight / Have struck more terror to the soul of
Richard . . ." This scene is as close as we get to tragic recognition in
the play, and the author's choice of words is not likely to be casual.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kirby C Farrell <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 15 Mar 1997 11:21:50 EST
Subject:        Re: Trouble onstage

From the PSYART (Psy'l Study of the Arts) list.  --Best, Norm Holland

Dear Norm,

Here's an anecdote from Frank Brownlow describing difficulties
performing in the Shakespearean act (I'd forwarded him the description
of Othello in trouble w/ his breeches):

There was a prod. years ago at the Birmingham Rep of Julius Caesar, done
on one of those sets that's all promontories. In those days every
well-dressed Shakespearean Roman wore a toga and carried a rolled-up
scroll. The actor playing Caesar came out on his promontory in the night
scene, stood there and said, "Thrice this night hath Calpurnia cried
help ho!," and the audience went off into fits of laughter. He broke
into a sweat and repeated the line, and the audience went crazy. After a
while things more or less settled down, he finished the scene, got off,
and asked what all that was about.  Turned out he'd been silhouetted,
casting a large shadow as he spoke the line, holding his scroll at 45
degrees at hip height.  The actor was Cyril Luckham, & he told me the
story himself.

FB
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.