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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Qs: Shakespeare and London; Disguise
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0362.  Sunday, 17 March 1997.

[1]     From:   JoAnna Koskinen <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Mar 1997 10:30:01 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare and London

[2]     From:   Simon Morgan-Russell <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Mar 1997 09:51:46 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Disguise


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JoAnna Koskinen <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Mar 1997 10:30:01 -0800
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare and London

Hi,

I hope you don't mind me asking for a little help on an issue of great
importance. I love reading and learning about Shakespeare. I love Milton
and Blake and Byron, and more than anything, I want to go to London! My
problem is simply this: I'm afraid of planes!!

What sense could it possibly make to become a teacher of Shakespeare,
yet never get to stand at the Globe and marvel at the history?? I am
truly ashamed of myself, but my fear is most real.

I have an opportunity to go to London every year for the past four
years, and  here I am again with another offer.

I need support from you people. I need you to tell me what a wimp I am;
that I need to get off my butt and on the plane! Threaten to ban me from
the board; tell me that you'll seek me out and have me tarred and
feathered if you have to!

Help me get to London!

Joke: A man sits in the psychiatrist's office trying to get over his
fear of flying. The Dr. explains to him the statistics, that more people
die from car accidents than plane flights, but it is of no use. The man
is still afraid. Finally, out of frustration, the Dr. says, "Ultimately,
you have to accept the fact that when it's your time to go, it's your
time to go." The man thought about this for a moment, looked up, and
said, "Yeah, but what if it's the pilot's time to go?"

JoAnna

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Simon Morgan-Russell <
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Date:           Saturday, 15 Mar 1997 09:51:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Disguise

A student of mine is writing about disguise in Renaissance drama.  He's
trying to recall if (and where) disguise is "seen through" in plays,
because it seems to him that disguise invariably works until it is
revealed by the disguised character.  For example, Pertinax Surly's
disguise in *The Alchemist* is only recognized as such by Subtle, Face,
etc. when Surly chooses to reveal himself.

Can anyone out there recall Renaissance plays in which disguise doesn't
work?

Thanks in advance.
Simon.
 

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